Tag Archive: unlockmyphone.ca


Ryans_PC_Repair_Shop-motherboard_pointIt’s that time of year again, the kids are going back to school and they need their computers and phones fixed before school starts!  Every year we get a huge rush in September so this year we’ve decided to offer every student that shows their student ID’s with the purchase and you will get an additional 10% off your computer or cell phone repair!

For our unlocking site UnlockMyPhone.ca use promo code “BACKTOSCHOOL2016” for an additional $5 dollars off any unlocking code or iPhone Factory Unlocking service.

We also wanted to give our current and new customers a huge heads up that we have the BIGGEST selection of gadgets, computer and phone accessories in the fraser valley in our shop on display at wholesale prices that can’t be beat!

Mention this post with your Glass/LCD Repair for a FREE GIFT!

VALID UNTIL SEPTEMBER 30th, 2016!

Just a quick update for our clients in the Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland – Even though we are tucked away we have the BIGGEST selection of WHOLESALE priced accessories. All Blue tagged items take an additional 25% OFF.  The sales starts on December 14th and goes all the way until December 28th!  What does that mean?  Our already low prices are an additional 25 PERCENT OFF!  Most of the cool stuff will have the blue tag discount so get here quick before everything is sold out!  Happy Holidays and a VERY Merry Christmas to all my friends that continue to support our business!

For our iphone 5/5s/5C/6/6 Plus Customers – Mention this and get a FREE case with your cell phone screen repair!  THIS OFFER IS VALID UNTIL DECEMBER 31ST!

For anyone unlocking their smartphone or iPhone on UnlockMyPhone.ca our unlocking website, use promo code “5OFFUNLOCK” for an additonal $5 dollars off any unlock code or iPhone factory unlock!

 

Here’s why many people want their BlackBerrys back after switching to iOS and Android

Following the release of the original iPhone in 2007 and the subsequent launch of Android, many people with work-issued phones spent years asking for their employers to switch away from BlackBerry smartphones to more modern devices. Finally, as Apple and Google increased their focus on security and BlackBerry hit dire straights a few years ago, workers began getting what that wanted and bring your own device (BYOD) policies became more common.

More recently, however, an interesting trend is being observed: Workers want their BlackBerry’s back.

CIO’s Tom Kaneshige reports on an interesting phenomenon that we’ve heard rumblings of in the past. At companies where employees were permitted to ditch their work-issued BlackBerry phones and bring their own iPhones and Android handsets, they’re now begging their IT departments to move back to BlackBerry.

Why? It turns out there are a few reasons.

For one thing, there are privacy concerns. When workers use their own iOS and Android devices, IT departments gain access to all of their private data in addition to any corporate apps that might be on the devices. It’s never a good thing when you have to hand over a smartphone packed full of naked selfies so that IT can fix an issue with email not syncing properly.

Beyond that, IT professionals Kaneshige spoke with say they are having some serious problems with mobile device management (MDM) software, and the related on-device apps often cause issues like battery drain and device bogging.

Source: BGR

BBM Finally Launches on iPhone and Android

404524-bbmIt has taken much longer than many industry watchers predicted, but Blackberry has finally gotten around to releasing a BBM app for iPhone and Android. The company has had a tough time of it lately, but maybe software is the way to keep the lights on. The app is now live in the App Store and Google Play, but there a waiting list.

BBM leaked on Android a few weeks back when the company was preparing for launch. The influx of new users caused server issues for Blackberry and delayed the launch. This is the reason for the waiting list, which most users will be subjected to. Anyone who signed up ahead of time for the service on the BBM website can log right in, but otherwise you’ll have to provide an email address and wait it out.

When you do get access, you’ll make a Blackberry ID and add your personal information. If you’ve used BBM on a Blackberry in the past, your contacts will populate immediately. If not, you’ll have to invite people. This process is different (and a bit counterintuitive) for first time users. BBM makes contact lists more secure, so you have to send the invite based on PIN, NFC pairing, or sending an email. You only get the contact added when the other party accepts the invitation.

BBM was the originator of the modern read receipt, and while that’s been replicated in both iMessage and Hangouts, BBM still does it pretty well. You can also do group chats, share pictures, and send files. It basically does all the stuff the first-part messaging clients do, but it’s running through Blackberry’s servers. If you’re worried about security, this should be on your radar.

The app is available for iPhone and Android phones. There isn’t any tablet support at this time.

Source: PC Magazine

Ryan Says: About FREAKING time!  Buh Bye WhatsApp!

Apple finally fixes App Store flaw by turning on encryption

Apple has finally fixed a security flaw in its application store that for years has allowed attackers to steal passwords and install unwanted or extremely expensive applications.

The flaw arose because Apple neglected to use encryption when an iPhone or other mobile device tries to connect to the App Store, meaning an attacker can hijack the connection. In addition to a security flaw, the unencrypted connections also created a privacy vulnerability because the complete list of applications installed on the device are disclosed over Wi-Fi.

It also allows the installation of apps, including extremely expensive ones that top out at $999.99, without the user’s consent, which can create serious consequences because Apple doesn’t give refunds. To do this, an attacker needs to be on the same private or public Wi-Fi network, including, for example, a coffeeshop, hotel, or airport network.

Security researcher Elie Bursztein discovered the vulnerability and reported it to Apple last July. Apple fixed the problem in a recent update that said “content is now served over HTTPS by default.” Apple also thanked Bernhard Brehm of Recurity Labs and Rahul Iyer of Bejoi.

Bursztein, who works at Google, in Mountain View, Calif., but emphasized this was work done at home in his spare time, published a personal blog post today that described details about the App Store vulnerability and included videos of how an attacker was able to steal passwords or install unwanted apps.

Publicizing this flaw, Bursztein said, highlighted how necessary encrypted HTTPS connections were. “Many companies don’t realize that HTTPS is important for mobile apps,” he said. But if they rely on Web connections or Webviews, he added, they are vulnerable to attacks: “Providing a concrete example seems a good way to attract developer attention to the issue.”

As a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University, Bursztein published research that included demonstrating flaws in Captchas and the Web interfaces of embedded devices. At the Defcon conference in Las Vegas two years ago, he demonstrated how to bypass Windows’ built-in encryption that Web browsers, instant messaging clients, and other programs used to store user passwords.

Bursztein’s blog post comes a day after Apple’s marketing chief, Phil Schiller, took a security-related swipe at Google on Twitter by pointing to a report on the rise of Android malware.

 

Source: CNET

Hands On With Clueful, the iOS App That Rats Out Privacy Risks

When you install a new mobile app, you expect it to use your data according to the permissions you’ve allowed. So, when an app suddenly uses your information in an unexpected way — who can forget Path’s address-book-sharing saga? — it can feel like a betrayal.

Clueful, which made its debut at TechCrunch Disrupt today, is an app designed to prevent surprises. Clueful helps you identify “misdemeanant” apps on your iPhone — software that’s transmitting your data in ways you weren’t aware of.

Created by antivirus software developer Bitdefender, the app is simple enough. It gathers information on what apps are running in your iPhone’s memory and submits it anonymously to the “Clueful Cloud” for analysis. Using its own database of app behaviors, it then tells you what your software could be up to: whether an app uses GPS, whether an app is a battery-draining risk, or if an app can use address book information, among other things. The results are neatly listed, albeit in what appears to be random order, and you can tap an app listing to get more details on the possible risk areas of that app.

It’s not all fire and brimstone, though. The app also reveals “Things you might appreciate” for each app, such as information on whether it uses an anonymous identifier or encrypts stored data. (Foodspotting, for instance, does both of these things.)

It can be surprising to learn which apps do and don’t have solid security practices, and which apps are quietly tracking usage information for advertising purposes — something most apps do not openly reveal when you download them.

The app has several major pitfalls, though. For one, it can only provide information on free apps, so that sketchy $1 Angry Birds ripoff you got last week could be having a field day with your personal info, and you’d still never know it. And although it launches with a database of thousands of apps, there are more than 600,000 apps in the App Store, according to Apple’s Q2 earnings report. Clueful lets you search to see which apps are in its database, and we found some relatively big names were left out: Clear, Mint and Evi to name just three.

Also, Clueful doesn’t drill down into exactly what data is being transmitted from an app. Instead, it just generally reports what an app can and could be sending. (“Can” and “could” are differentiated.) Strangely, Clueful also “found” apps on my phone that I’ve never used or downloaded, like FlickFishing HD in the image above, and apps called Scoops and Quizarium. I’m sure they’re fine apps, but I’ve never downloaded them.

At $4 in the App Store, I can’t rightly recommend this app as a must-download. But if you’re completely anal about how your data is being used, or just curious, the download could be justified.

Source: Wired