Tag Archive: Samsung Repair Abbotsford


Android 4.4.3 KitKat update reportedly coming soon

After a never-before-seen version of KitKat has been spotted a few days ago – version KTU65 – suggesting that Google may release at least one more KitKat update before moving to a new Android OS version, a new tweet from known developer LlabTooFeR says that Android 4.4.3 may be just around the corner, with version KTU72B identified as the upcoming software update.

“Android 4.4.3 is under testing. Build number is KTU72B,” the developer wrote. “Probably it will fix known camera bug.” This KitKat version’s code name suggests this build (dated March 13) is newer than the previous one (dated March 6,) although the developer did not share any details as to when Google will actually release it.

Similarly, it’s not clear whether the update will bring any new features, on top of the expected camera fix for the Nexus 5, and whether it will be available to other devices as well. Still, this appears to be first time these newly discovered KitKat builds are associated with “Android 4.4.3.”

The latest KitKat software version available to Android users is KOT49H (Android 4.4.2), although only some devices have been updated so far, including Nexus tablets and smartphones. A recent report said that Google will unveil Android 4.5 this summer, likely together with new Nexus devices – the company is rumored to ship at least one new tablet this year, with rumors indicating that a Nexus device with an 8.9-inch may be in the works.

Source: BGR

BBM Finally Launches on iPhone and Android

404524-bbmIt has taken much longer than many industry watchers predicted, but Blackberry has finally gotten around to releasing a BBM app for iPhone and Android. The company has had a tough time of it lately, but maybe software is the way to keep the lights on. The app is now live in the App Store and Google Play, but there a waiting list.

BBM leaked on Android a few weeks back when the company was preparing for launch. The influx of new users caused server issues for Blackberry and delayed the launch. This is the reason for the waiting list, which most users will be subjected to. Anyone who signed up ahead of time for the service on the BBM website can log right in, but otherwise you’ll have to provide an email address and wait it out.

When you do get access, you’ll make a Blackberry ID and add your personal information. If you’ve used BBM on a Blackberry in the past, your contacts will populate immediately. If not, you’ll have to invite people. This process is different (and a bit counterintuitive) for first time users. BBM makes contact lists more secure, so you have to send the invite based on PIN, NFC pairing, or sending an email. You only get the contact added when the other party accepts the invitation.

BBM was the originator of the modern read receipt, and while that’s been replicated in both iMessage and Hangouts, BBM still does it pretty well. You can also do group chats, share pictures, and send files. It basically does all the stuff the first-part messaging clients do, but it’s running through Blackberry’s servers. If you’re worried about security, this should be on your radar.

The app is available for iPhone and Android phones. There isn’t any tablet support at this time.

Source: PC Magazine

Ryan Says: About FREAKING time!  Buh Bye WhatsApp!

Lock Screen Security Bug Found: Samsung Galaxy S3

Following closely on the heels of a Samsung Galaxy Note 2 security vulnerability, another Samsung user has found that the bug affects other models.

Unlike the Samsung Galaxy Note 2 flaw, the bug allows for full access to the Samsung Galaxy S3. The method is similar in that it requires a fleet-fingered user to hop through a number of screens.

As discovered by Sean McMillian, the smartphone can be manipulated by tapping through the emergency call, emergency contacts, home screen, and then the power button twice. McMillian admits that the bug isn’t consistent — sometimes, he said, it works right away, while other times it takes 20 attempts.

Indeed, we weren’t able to replicate the bug after many tries (Engadget was able to do it, but it took a long time). That suggests that would-be snoopers must act quickly and deftly, but the lesson here (and always) is to keep a watchful eye on that $500 smartphone.

As McMillian indicates, the bug seems to be related to Samsung’s software and not an Android-wide issue. Judging by the similarities in the two flaws, we might expect Samsung to issue software updates to address the concerns.

Source: CNET

Samsung, You’re Doing It Wrong With Android 4.0

The No. 2 bestselling Samsung smartphone in history won’t officially see an upgrade to Android 4.0, leaving owners to decide among buying a newer phone, sticking with Android 2.3, or hacking on a custom build of Google’s latest mobile operating system. The reason Samsung won’t be offering such an upgrade? According to Samsung Tomorrow by way of the Verge, Samsung’s own customized TouchWiz user interface is the answer, which sounds more like a lame excuse than a valid explanation.

Samsung’s Galaxy Tab—a 7-in. slate I’ve been using daily for more than a year now—is also on the “won’t see Android 4.0″ list, says the Samsung Tomorrow blog. I can understand we’re looking at a smartphone and a tablet that made their debut in 2010, and there’s a limited shelf life for future updates on mobile devices. What I don’t understand, nor accept, is that the issue is Samsung’s user interface software. Even worse, I think Samsung is shooting itself in the foot. Here’s why.

You have to treat current customers well. On the one hand, I can see Samsung’s stance if it chooses not to bring Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS) to these older devices. From a financial standpoint, those handsets and tablets are already sold, and Samsung has earned all the income it’s going to from the sale of such devices. To bring Android 4.0 to the Galaxy S and Galaxy Tab, the company would have to invest time, effort, and money to deliver the software. It has no financial incentive to do so. But customers don’t care about that and could decide to buy a competing product if they feel slighted.

Software add-ons should never stop product advances. Some people like TouchWiz, and some don’t. The same could be said for HTC’s Sense. Both are user interface add-ons atop Google Android, and neither should be the primary cause of stopping an Android update. HTC once fell into this same trap with Gingerbread on its Desire handset and eventually compromised by removing some custom apps to make room for the update.

This isn’t a technical issue, it’s a bad decision. My first thought about this situation was that perhaps the Galaxy S and Galaxy Tab didn’t have the horsepower to run Android 4.0. Yet the Nexus S, made by Samsung, will get the ICS software, and it has very similar specifications to the Galaxy S in terms of memory, storage capacity, and processor. And I’m willing to bet the Android enthusiast community will have a custom build of Android 4.0 for both devices, if it doesn’t already. How sad is it that external developers can make this happen, when Samsung can’t?

Will most people who own a Samsung Galaxy S or Galaxy Tab be in an uproar over this? Probably not, as they’ll likely never know about Samsung’s decision, nor will they be thinking about Android 4.0 for devices that are 18 months old. But the decision sets a bad precedent and suggests that Samsung is more concerned with selling newer hardware than supporting existing customers and their current devices.

My suggestion would be a compromise of sorts: Offer a stock version of Android 4.0 for these devices with the customer understanding and accepting the fact that the TouchWiz interface will no longer be available after the upgrade. Unless there’s a real technical reason for the lack of an Android 4.0 upgrade—something Samsung should make clear—this might be the best answer. It wouldn’t cost nearly as much for Samsung to develop and test, while consumers thinking Samsung has let them down might be more accepting of the situation.

Ryan:  Samsung needs to seriously get their &%#* together.  I would like to update my Samsung Galaxy Tab, I find it buggy and it force closes way too much, too bad I will be forced to workaround this to put 4.0 on myself manually.

 

Source: BusinessWeek