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Missing Xbox One Dolby audio options coming post-launch

The Xbox One will add support for Dolby 5.1 and 7.1 digital audio through a post-launch patch, director of product planning Albert Penello said today.

“Dolby Digital is coming post launch,” Penello said on NeoGAF. “This was a [software] scheduling issue pure and simple, and I know people are disappointed, but we will have it.”

No timetable for the patch’s release was provided. This means that until the Xbox One audio patch is released, Microsoft’s next-generation system is not capable of doing optical audio on the level of the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, or PlayStation 4.

Penello explained that anyone with an HDMI receiver “should be fine” because uncompressed 5.1 and 7.1 audio is passed through HDMI and DTS.

“Even if you have a Dolby only HDMI receiver (which I’m not sure exists), you will still get 5.1 or 7.1 sound since those receivers should accept uncompressed surround,” he said.

For Dolby-only headsets, Penello said he understands that these should work on Xbox One from launch, though users will only receive stereo audio.

“I have not tested this myself, but I’m told it works. Regardless, I understand this is an inconvenience, but again we’re going to have Dolby coming,” he said.

Headset company Astro, which said previously that its products would work without issue on Xbox One, released a statement on the matter following Microsoft’s announcement, confirming that because the Xbox One will not have Dolby support at launch, there will be ramifications for Astro products.

“While our products do not process DTS signals, we do have on-board Dolby encoding in both our A50 Wireless Transmitter as well as our Wired MixAmp Pro. An Xbox One gamer will need to select Stereo output for game audio, but our MixAmps will process that stereo signal with Dolby ProLogic II and encode it with Dolby Headphone,” the company said.

 

Source: GameSpot

Researchers Say They Took Down World’s Third-Largest Botnet

On Wednesday, computer security experts took down Grum, the world’s third-largest botnet, a cluster of infected computers used by cybercriminals to send spam to millions of people. Grum, computer security experts say, was responsible for roughly 18 percent of global spam, or 18 billion spam messages a day.

Computer security experts blocked the botnet’s command and control servers in the Netherlands and Panama on Tuesday. But later that day, Grum’s architects had already set up seven new command and control centers in Russia and Ukraine. FireEye, a computer security company based in Milpitas, Calif., said it worked with its counterparts in Russia and with SpamHaus, a British organization that tracks and blocks spam, to take down those command and control centers Wednesday morning.

The researchers said they were able to vanquish the botnet by tracing Grum back to its servers and alerting Internet service providers to shut those computers down.

Technologists have taken the lead in combating digital crime rather than waiting for law enforcement authorities to act. Earlier this year, Microsoft employees assisted federal marshals in a raid on botnet servers in Pennsylvania and Illinois. Those servers were used by criminals to run Zeus, a botnet that siphoned people’s personal information, like online bank account passwords and credit card numbers, from infected computers. Almost simultaneously, a separate group of cybersecurity researchers in San Francisco were busy eliminating another botnet, called Kelihos.b, which was used to send spam.

While computer security companies are quick to publicize botnet takedowns, their gains tend to be temporary. The blocking of Kelihos.b lasted less than a week before a modified version of the botnet started infecting computers. Microsoft’s takedown of Waledac, another spam botnet in 2010, lasted only as long as the time it took its creators to modify its architecture slightly and create a new botnet.

So what’s to say Grum’s creators will not just run their botnet from a new command and control center tomorrow?

“It’s not about creating a new server. They’d have to start an entirely new campaign and infect hundreds of thousands of new machines to get something like Grum started again,” said Atif Mushtaq, a computer security specialist at FireEye.”They’d have to build from scratch. Because of how the malware was written for Grum, when the master server is dead, the infected machines can no longer send spam or communicate with a new server.”

Source: New York Times