Tag Archive: Mac Repair Abbotsford


Hey Everyone,

It’s been a very busy start to the new year for our shop, we have been doing a tremendous amount of iMac and Macbook Repair over the last year and we would like to let everyone know who keeps asking, we DO repair all iMac and Macbook computers and ALL Apple products including iPod (All Models) and iPad.  Ask about getting you iMac Hard Drive replaced to a Solid State Drive (SSD) and a full tune up including internal and external cleaning.  If you’ve had your mac longer then 3 years chances are its super dusty inside and will need to be cleaned internally!

We offer a complete Mac-Tune-Up Package with Sierra OS installed and your option of a 120GB, 240GB, 480GB or 1TB SSD upgrade which will make your computer  respond much faster (apps open quicker, shorters boot/reboot times) + a HUGE LIST of apps to choose from!

We hope everyone has an awesome 2017 – All the best to you and your loved ones! – Ryan

Here Is How Hackers Can Spy On Your MacBook Camera

Just a few months ago, a story broke about how Samsung smart TVs were susceptible to remote spying by users that hack into the built-in camera. Now, new research demonstrates that MacBook webcams are just as susceptible to being hacked and spied-on as televisions.

Researchers at John Hopkins University discovered exactly how the hacking process is possible without signaling for the light adjacent to the camera to turn on, which is usually an indication that the camera is on.

The primary researcher, computer science professor Stephen Checkoway, published a paper in conjunction with graduate student Matthew Brocker entitled “iSeeYou: Disabling the MacBook Webcam Indicator LED” that contains the detailed process of remotely spying on others’ laptops. Although the researchers could only prove their methods worked with MacBooks created before 2008, they suggest that the process could be successfully repeated with newer computers.

The Washington Post recently ran an article detailing the story of Miss Teen USA Cassidy Wolf, who received nude photographs of herself via email. After an FBI investigation, the authorities discovered that Wolf’s former high school classmate Jared Abrahams had hacked into her computer, as well as the computers of several other women, and had been spying on them via their webcam.

The case of Wolf as well as the new research from John Hopkins raises several issues about privacy and security in the modern world. While Apple’s light was intended as a security feature to alert users when their camera was on, it appears that hackers have found an easily solution to disable that feature. According to The Washington Post, the FBI has been using similar hacking technology for years.

Source: PRPick.com

Upgrading RAM on the new iMac is practically impossible

The electronics website iFixit on Friday downgraded the new 21.5-inch iMac’s repair score to 3 out of a possible 10, calling servicing the computer “an exercise in disappointment.”

The website urged do-it-yourselfers to look for a leftover 2011 model instead. “Hackers, tinkerers, and repairers be forewarned: Get last year’s model if you’d like to alter your machine in any way,” said Miroslav Djuric, iFixit’s chief information architect, in an email announcing the site’s teardown of the newest iMac.

Apple started selling the redesigned 21.5-inch iMac on Friday at its retail and online stores. The larger, more expensive 27-in. iMac is to ship later this month.

After disassembling the iMac, iFixit assigned the all-in-one desktop a repair score of just 3 out of 10; The 2011 version of the same-sized iMac sported a more DIY-friendly score of 7 out of 10.

The iMac’s new score is in the same low range as Apple’s 15- and 13-inch Retina-equipped MacBook Pro laptops, which earned a 1 and 2, respectively, this summer and fall. In June, iFixit called the 15-inch MacBook Pro “the least-repairable laptop we’ve taken apart.”

Explaining the iMac’s low score, iFixit cited the copious amounts of “incredibly strong” adhesive that bonds the LCD and front glass panel to the frame. Earlier iMacs fixed the display in place with magnets rather than the hard-to-dislodge glue, which is even harder to replace.

Just as damning was an Apple design decision that makes it practically impossible for users to upgrade the iMac’s RAM. The 21.5-in. iMac comes standard with 8GB of memory – and can be upgraded to 16GB – but because the RAM is buried beneath the logic board, owners must “take apart most of the iMac just to gain access,” iFixit said.

Older 21.5-inch iMacs had four external RAM slots that were easily accessed by users.

Apple mentions the impracticality of memory upgrade only in a side note hidden on the iMac’s options page. There, Apple said: “Every 21.5-inch iMac comes with 8GB of memory built into the computer. If you think you may need 16GB of memory in the future, it is important to upgrade at the time of purchase, because memory cannot be upgraded later in this model.”

The not-yet-available 27-inch iMac will continue to sport four external memory slots. Customers can boost the RAM at the time of ordering to 16GB (for an extra $200) or 32GB ($600), but those prices are exorbitant compared to third-party RAM that users install themselves. An additional 8GB of memory – which would raise the iMac’s total to 16GB – costs just $40 at Crucial.com, for example.

iFixit spotted several other changes to the iMac, including a larger, single fan rather than several smaller fans; dual microphones, likely a noise cancellation move for FaceTime video calls; and a vibration-dampening housing around the laptop-sized 2.5-in. hard disk drive.

The teardown also exposed the location where Apple places a “Fusion Drive,” the option that combines 128GB of flash storage with a standard platter-based hard drive.

The new iMacs are priced between $1,299 and $1,999 – $100 more than their precursors – and can be purchased or pre-ordered at Apple’s online and retail stores.

iFixit reduced the repair score of Apple’s iMac from 7 to 3 (out of 10), citing screen-to-chassis glue and the impracticality of upgrading RAM or swapping drives.

Source: TechWorld

Valve: Agree to not sue us or lose access to Steam

Gamers beware: Valve Software, the firm behind immensely popular gaming portal Steam, wants you to waive your right to sue before you continue gathering games using its digital distribution platform. The company has amended its subscriber agreement to stipulate that by subscribing to its service, users agree to not file lawsuits against the company. Gaming giants Microsoft (MSFT), Sony (SNE) and Electronic Arts (EA) have similar policies in place, Kotaku notes.

“It’s clear to us that in some situations, class actions have real benefits to customers,” Valve said in a statement. “In far too many cases however, class actions don’t provide any real benefit to users and instead impose unnecessary expense and delay, and are often designed to benefit the class action lawyers who craft and litigate these claims.”

The statement continued, ”Class actions like these do not benefit us or our communities. We think this new dispute resolution process is faster and better for you and Valve while avoiding unnecessary costs, and that it will therefore benefit the community as a whole.”

Source: Yahoo!

Apple patches serious security holes in iOS devices

Apple has shipped a high-priority iOS update to fix multiple security holes affecting the browser used on iPhones, iPads and iPod Touch devices.

The iOS 5.1.1 update fixes four separate vulnerabilities, including one that could be used to take complete control of an affected device.

Here’s the skinny of this batch of updates:

  • A URL spoofing issue existed in Safari. This could be used in a malicious web site to direct the user to a spoofed site that visually appeared to be a legitimate domain. This issue is addressed through improved URL handling. This issue does not affect OS X systems.
  • Multiple security holes in the open-source WebKit rendering engine. These could lead to cross-site scripting attacks from maliciously crafted web sites. These vulnerabilities were used during Google’s Pwnium contest at this year’s CanSecWest conference.
  • A memory corruption issue in WebKit. Visiting a maliciously crafted website may lead to an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution. This issue was discovered and reported by Google’s security team.

This patch is only available via iTunes. To check that the iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad has been updated:

  1. Navigate to Settings
  2. Select General
  3. Select About. The version after applying this update will be “5.1.1″.

Ryan says: As always, do not update to 5.1.1 if your iPhone is unlocked or jailbroken already or if you plan doing this in the future.

Half a million Mac computers ‘infected with malware

More than half a million Apple computers have been infected with the Flashback Trojan, according to a Russian anti-virus firm.

Its report claims that about 600,000 Macs have installed the malware – potentially allowing them to be hijacked and used as a “botnet”.

The firm, Dr Web, says that more than half that number are based in the US.

Apple has released a security update, but users who have not installed the patch remain exposed.

Flashback was first detected last September when anti-virus researchers flagged up software masquerading itself as a Flash Player update. Once downloaded it deactivated some of the computer’s security software.

Later versions of the malware exploited weaknesses in the Java programming language to allow the code to be installed from bogus sites without the user’s permission.

Dr Web said that once the Trojan was installed it sent a message to the intruder’s control server with a unique ID to identify the infected machine.

“By introducing the code criminals are potentially able to control the machine,” the firm’s chief executive Boris Sharov told the BBC.

“We stress the word potential as we have never seen any malicious activity since we hijacked the botnet to take it out of criminals’ hands. However, we know people create viruses to get money.

“The largest amounts of bots – based on the IP addresses we identified – are in the US, Canada, UK and Australia, so it appears to have targeted English-speaking people.”

Dr Web also notes that 274 of the infected computers it detected appeared to be located in Cupertino, California – home to Apple’s headquarters.

Java’s developer, Oracle, issued a fix to the vulnerability on 14 February, but this did not work on Macintoshes as Apple manages Java updates to its computers.

Apple released its own “security update” on Wednesday – more than eight weeks later. It can be triggered by clicking on the software update icon in the computer’s system preferences panel.

The security firm F-Secure has also posted detailed instructions about how to confirm if a machine is infected and how to remove the Trojan.

Although Apple’s system software limits the actions its computers can take without requesting their users’ permission, some security analysts suggest this latest incident highlights the fact that the machines are not invulnerable.

“People used to say that Apple computers, unlike Windows PCs, can’t ever be infected – but it’s a myth,” said Timur Tsoriev, an analyst at Kaspersky Lab.

Apple could not provide a statement at this time.

Ryan: Download Apple’s security update for the Flashback Trojan here.

Source: BBC News