Tag Archive: iPhone


Most of you know about our PC repair services, but did you know we fix/repair/unlock cellphones & tablets? Did you also know that we offer the lowest prices in the Fraser Valley and will price match and BEAT any competitor price? Now you do.

We repair all Smartphones / iPhones for :

* Broken LCD Screens & Touch Screen Replacement
* Water and other Liquid Damage Repair / Corrosion Clean Up
* Phone Data Recovery – Photos, Music, Text Messages
* No Power / Phone does not turn on
* Charging Problems / Charging Controller / Charging Port Replacement
* Battery Replacement (200+ Batteries in stock)
* Staticky, Crackling Speakers & Microphones
* Home Button / Power Lock Button Replacement
* Malfunctioning button, Trackball, Trackpad and Keypad
* Malfunctioning SIM card readers / NO SIM Reading Fix
* Software problems, upgrades and reflashing (All Models)
* Language change
* JTAG Service (Android Phones)
* Unknown Baseband, IMEI missing
* Password Protected / Disabled Phones / Pattern Lock Reset (Samsung)
* Jailbreaking — iPhone, AppleTV 1 & 2 + FREE TV & MOVIES + FREE APPS
* Rooting — Most Android Models — Custom Rom Reflashing Available

We unlock ALL Smartphones For :

* iPhone 2G/3G/3GS (Most iOS Versions)
* iPhone 4/4S – Factory unlock Fido/Rogers/Telus/Koodo/AT&T/Bell
* iPhone 5 – Factory unlock Telus/Koodo/AT&T/Rogers/Fido
* iPhone 4S/5 unlocking for iOS 5.x, 6.1.3 and below!
* BlackBerry, Samsung, LG, HTC
* Nokia, Motorola, Sony Ericsson, Huawei, Alcatel and other Overseas Models.

– iPhone Factory unlock for USA, UK, Brazil, Australia, France, Spain, Ireland, Netherlands, Denmark, Norway, Chile, Switzerland, Sweden, Saudi Arabia, Norway, Romania, Japan, etc.

As always, we DO NOT charge for repairs that cannot be performed.

180 Warranty on ALL parts & Labour – We ONLY use OEM Factory Parts.

Call the shop if you need a price quote, make sure to ask for Ryan.

Apple security expert finds apps-software bug

A software flaw in Apple Inc’s iPhones and iPads may allow hackers to build apps that secretly install programs to steal data, send text messages or destroy information, according to an expert on Apple device security.

Charlie Miller, a researcher with Accuvant Labs who identified the problem, built a prototype malicious program to test the flaw. He said Apple’s App Store failed to identify the malicious program, which made it past the security vetting process.

There is as yet no evidence that hackers have exploited the vulnerability in Apple’s iOS software. But Miller said his test demonstrated that there could be real malware in the App Store.

“Until now you could just download everything from the App Store and not worry about it being malicious. Now you have no idea what an app might do,” Miller said.

Miller said he proved his theory by building a stock-market monitoring tool, InstaStock, that was programed to connect to his server once downloaded, and to then download whatever program he wants.

Apple did not respond to requests for comment.

Miller, who in 2009 identified a bug in the iPhone text-messaging system that allowed attackers to gain remote control over the devices, said that he had contacted the company about the vulnerability.

“They are in the process of fixing it,” he said.

Miller is scheduled to present his detailed research at the SyScan ’11 security conference in Taiwan next week.

 

 

Source: Reuters

Android climbs to 43% in US, iPhone still at 28%

Android is still growing in the US, but is taking all its share from non-iPhone rivals, Nielsen found on Monday. Google was up from 40 percent in July to 43 percent in August, but Apple was still at the 28 percent it has held since June. Most of that decline came from Microsoft, which took the “other” category down from 13 percent to 11 percent.

RIM’s BlackBerry also lost a point to 18 percent. It may have been helped by a slew of BlackBerry 7 phones shipping the same month, such as the Bold 9900 and 9930.

Google still had added momentum in the Nielsen research. Among those who had bought a smartphone in the past three months, 56 percent were buying Android. Apple still wasn’t under threat with a static 28 percent, but there had been extra pressure on Microsoft and RIM, which collapsed to about six and nine points. Both audiences may have been in holding patterns for most of the summer as they either waited for later BlackBerry 7 launches or for Windows Phone 7​.5 (Mango) in October.

Android may see a rare share reversal in October. The year so far has been unusual as Apple’s first where a new iPhone didn’t ship in the summer. Possibilities exist that iphone sharecould start growing again as Apple fills pent-up demand, most of all if a Sprint iPhone 5 ships and eliminates another shelter for Android.

Smartphones should also still be on track to become the dominant cellphones in the US, researchers said. They were now up to 43 percent of total ownership and at 58 percent among those who had bought in the past three months. Ownership is expected to cross the 50 percent mark before the end of the year as the iPhone 5, and more Android devices like the Galaxy S II tip the balance.

Source: Electronista

Adobe Gives Up on Flash for iPhone and iPad

The Flash plug-in for browsers has been the de facto king of Web video, interactive websites and annoying ads that get in your face since it was owned by Macromedia. So when it was announced the iPhone would be shipping without Flash — and wouldn’t ever have Flash on it — a lot of people freaked out. Why was Steve Jobs being so mean? Android phones are getting Flash!

As the owner of one of those Android phones that has the Flash player installed, though, I can tell you why the iPhone’s not getting Flash: It’s awful. It runs horribly, and horribly slow. It’s a crapshoot whether it works at all, on my phone from last year, and that’s just to play a Web video. And Flash games like Robot Unicorn Attack? Right out.

Fortunately, a lot of these games and videos are available through apps like the YouTube one. That’s how iPhone owners watch them. And it seems Adobe has finally accepted that.

Introducing the Flash Media Server

Don’t be fooled by the headline on Boy Genius Report’s article. Adobe’s not bringing Flash anything to iPhones or iPads. Instead, website owners can buy these Flash Media servers for upward of $995, and they’ll convert Flash movies into a form that iGadgets can use.

There are a number of downsides with this plan. One, it doesn’t work on all websites; only the ones with owners who paid Adobe hundreds or thousands of dollars. And two, it costs hundreds or thousands of dollars. How many bloggers and restaurant owners are going to want to shell out $995 to $4,500 just so iPhone owners can watch ads in their web browsers instead of YouTube?

If anything, Adobe’s given people a reason to use HTML 5 video, or movies that play outside of Flash Player. Flash was fun while it lasted, but it’s going the way of the dinosaur. This “media server” thing is just an expensive kludge to artificially extend its lifespan, by milking businesses that are addicted to it.

But iPhones can’t browse the full web!

Actually, iPhone owners will have a better web browsing experience than most Android phone owners. Instead of having their battery life drained by a choppy Flash video — one that would just crash low-end smartphones like mine — they’ll get web movies in a format their iPhone can play without breaking a sweat.

Let’s face it: It’s been four years since the iPhone came out, and roughly three years since the first Android phone did. Adobe has had plenty of time to make Flash do its thing, and/or beg, plead, and cajole Apple into putting Flash on the iPhone. The Flash Media Server products show that it’s given up, at least on the “persuade Apple” part. And the poor quality of the Flash experience on Android smartphones and tablets suggests that it may be wise for Adobe to give up there as well.

Source: Yahoo! Contributor Network

Vonage offering unlimited international calling via mobile phones

Vonage’s international calling plan is stepping up to be a more affordable and flexible option as the service extends to mobile.

The new Vonage World plan is as follows: Subscribers can call land-line numbers in over 60 countries from either their own land-line or mobile phone using the VoIP service for $25.99 per month. Users can also call mobile numbers in up to 10 countries on the same plan.

Vonage suggests that anyone who already conducts international phone calls for a little as an hour a week could save up to $250 with this option.

Mike Tempora, senior vice president of product management for Vonage, said that the mobile option was in high demand from its customers, citing that “70 percent said they make international calls while their away from home either by using a calling card or paying high carrier rates.”

Additionally, the revamped plan includes the new Extensions feature, which enables customers to add any U.S. phone number (mobile, home or office) as another number on the plan. (Note that fax numbers as well as 800/887 and virtual numbers are not supported). That number can then double as a virtual calling card to re-route calls over the Vonage’s network.

For example, this makes the most sense if a subscriber has Vonage World at home or work, and wants to add his or her cell phone number to the plan, or vice versa.

The process to take advantage of this might seem a bit complicated on paper, but it’s rather straightforward. Once the user registers the number on his or her online account page, the user will then have to select a PIN number for validating the subscriber and the phone line later on. From there, when the user wants to make an international call, he or she just dials an access number, the PIN number and then the international phone number he or she is calling.

Tempora added that customers who use virtual numbers and/or international calling cards will find the process to be quite similar and intuitive.

Although this service is supported by any mobile device, there will be apps for iOS and Android in the coming weeks with a one-touch solution to streamline this process.

Ryan: Good news for people looking for a cheaper alternative to call overseas. I will be definitely downloading the app once it hits the Android Market.

Source: ZDNet

Jailbroken iOS 5 devices: No OTA updates for you

The iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad crowd got understandably excited with the word that the next version of iOS, iOS 5, will finally usher in over-the-air (OTA) updates for the platform. Android device owners have been enjoying OTA updates from the beginning, and finally Apple is cutting the cord for device updates. Folks are already using beta versions of iOS 5 even though it won’t officially appear until later this year, and the early adopters discovered that the first iOS 5 beta update just released OTA will not work on jailbroken devices.

Android device owners are already familiar with the lack of OTA updates on rooted devices, the equivalent to the jailbroken iOS device. Rooting or jailbreaking is the process owners go through to allow unofficial software to be installed to serve functions the official OS doesn’t support. It has long been understood that rooting an Android device ends OTA updating, and it is now clear the same will apply on the iOS front for jailbroken devices.

Those using beta iOS 5 report you can still apply Apple updates by connecting to a computer via USB cable, so all is not lost. Getting OS updates OTA is a much better alternative to cabling up a device, so those with jailbroken iPhones may need to rethink that once iOS 5 is officially released.

Ryan:  I say disable Automatic Updates in iTunes (Apple only seems to be updating iOS when new Jailbreaks are released), and stop tethering completely!

Source: ZDNet

JailbreakMe.com back online, easy iOS jailbreaking for all!

JailbreakMe.com. the web-based jailbreak tool for (almost all) iOS devices, is back online once more after a long hiatus.

The process is simple and pain-free. Just visit the website in the Safari browser and click the FREE button to begin the process. It uses a PDF exploit to carry out the hack and it’s very fast – and there’s no need to connect your iOS device up to a PC or Mac to do it.

Because the hack relies on a know known PDF exploit, the developers of the hack recommend installing “PDF Patcher 2″ in Cydia once you’ve jailbroken the device.

The following devices are supported:

  • iPad1: 4.3 through 4.3.3
  • iPad2: 4.3.3
  • iPhone3GS: 4.3 through 4.3.3
  • iPhone4: 4.3 through 4.3.3
  • iPhone4-CDMA: 4.2.6 through 4.2.8
  • iPod touch 3g: 4.3, 4.3.2, 4.3.3
  • iPod touch 4g: 4.3 through 4.3.3

The only iOS devices that aren’t supported are the 1st and 2nd generation iPhones.

 

For more information check out the Q&A here.

Source: ZDNet

Untethered Jailbreak for iOS 4.3.3 Now Available

If you recently upgraded to iOS 4.3.3 that fixed Locationgate woes, you’ll be delighted to know that untethered jailbreak and unlock for iOS 4.3.3 is now available. The iPhone Dev-team have updated their PwnageTool and redsn0w programs so it’s now possible to jailbreak iOS 4.3.3 using Mac and Windows in a way that doesn’t require connecting the device to a computer each time it’s rebooted.

The iOS 4.3.3 untethered jailbreak is based on the exploit created by @i0nic for iOS 4.3.1. The updated redsn0w tool also allows you to turn on multitasking gestures, the team noted in a blog post. If you wish to unlock your device for use with any carrier, there’s an app for that.

To unlock an iOS 4.3.3 device, use the ultrasn0w tool. Remember that ultrasn0w at the time of this writing only worked with iPhone 4 baseband 1.59.00 and iPhone 3G/3GS basebands 4.26.08, 5.11.07, 5.12.01, 5.13.04 and 6.15.00. Use a custom IPSW to update to 4.3.3 in order to avoid updating your baseband. You may wanna use excellent ipswDownloader for Mac to easily find and download any iOS firmware build. This app also figures out your baseband version and tells you whether your iOS version can be jailbroken and unlocked. If you’re on Windows, download the f0recast app that checks whether your device is unlockable or tethered with a USB connect.

If you just want to perform an untethered iOS 4.3.3 jailbreak, I recommend handy step-by-step guides for redsn0w or PwnageTool. The below video shows how easy it is to perform an untethered jailbreak of iOS 4.3.3 via redsn0w 0.9.6rc15. For newbies, iClarified.com provides a wealth of jailbreaking and unlocking guides. And if you need a reason to jailbreak, Cydia creator Saurik has a few.

As for the iPad 2 jailbreak, it’s still pending per a note over at the iPhone Dev-team blog.

The iPad2 jailbreak remains under development. As you may know, the original exploit @comex developed in the first week of the iPad2 release was mysteriously fixed by Apple within days of its development. Partly because of this, don’t expect much public discussion of the iPad2 jailbreak until it’s actually finished and ready for release (and please avoid asking about it). In all liklihood, it will be a userland exploit like the first (unreleased) one, not dependent on bootrom dumps. The first one can’t be released even for those with the original 4.3 firmware due to legal (distribution) reasons.

 

Download the Untethered Jailbreak for iOS 4.3.3 Mac OS X version, here.

Download the Untethered Jailbreak for iOS 4.3.3 for Windows XP/Vista/7 here.

The PwnageTool Official BitTorrent Release, via BitTorrent, here.

Source: 9 to 5 Mac

What Android Phones Do that Apple Phones Don’t

Does anyone remember this ad for the Motorola Droid? “Everything iDon’t,” it said, “Droid does!”

Of course, the iPhone can do half of those things now, like take 5-megapixel pictures in the dark. And the usefulness of some of the others is up for debate. (What exactly is “Open development?”) But even today, there are some pretty big things the iPhone can’t do, that Android phones can … and you may be surprised by some of them.

Come in all different shapes and sizes

Here’s one you probably won’t be surprised by, although you might be surprised by some of the weird Android phones out there. A slider phone with a second touch screen instead of a keyboard?

In all seriousness, though, the one-size-fits-all iPhone leaves out the people it doesn’t fit. Want a keyboard with actual keys? A gigantic screen, plus a kickstand for watching movies? There’s an Android phone out there for you. There’s even a phone with a slide-out game controller, a la the PSP Go. And speaking of portable PlayStations.

Run PlayStation games

And I don’t just mean games that were originally made for the Sony PlayStation (although like the Xperia Play.

These things are made for gaming, to Sony’s specs, and have access to tons of exclusive games. They can even connect to the PlayStation Network, using will be able to play Android games designed for the PlayStation Certified phones, which just shows how committed Sony is to gaming on Android devices.

Buy apps from Amazon

That’s right, Amazon has its own “Appstore for Android.” So why would you want to go through its 8-step signup process?

Well, first off is the “free app of the day.” These aren’t apps that are normally free, and are being promoted; they’re paid apps, costing as much as $4.99 sometimes, they’re put up for download for free. A new one goes up each day, like it says. You can also use Amazon.com to look for all discounted apps, or to read reviews and look for similar apps, just like you would for any other product you buy from Amazon.

 

 

A bunch of other stuff?

The iPhone doesn’t support text reflow, which is an Android feature that makes it so zoomed-in text on a website fits the screen width, so that you don’t have to swipe back and forth to read paragraphs. It also doesn’t support home screen “widgets,” which let you do things like check your bank balance or the latest news stories without opening an app. There’s even a widget to set your phone to silent mode. With all this stuff Android phones can do that the iPhone can’t, one might ask: Why does anyone buy an iPhone at all?

The answer’s as simple as it is obvious. The iPhone’s the best-designed smartphone there is, and it has more and better apps than every Android phone combined. Plus, Apple’s clout means that the wireless carriers can’t mess up its phones, with huge logos and non-uninstallable apps.

One size, though, doesn’t fit all. And thanks to Android’s open-source programming code, companies like Sony and Amazon are getting to try some interesting things, that they never would’ve been able to on the iPhone.

Source: Yahoo! / Video: IntoMobile

Inquiries Grow Over Apple’s Data Collection Practices

The controversy surrounding the security of Apple’s iPhone and iPad escalated Thursday as some European governments said they would investigate whether the company had violated privacy laws by collecting and storing users’ geographic location data.

The introduction of the Apple iPad 2 in London in March drew crowds. Now the security of the device is being widely questioned.

At the same time, some researchers said that contrary to reports published Wednesday, the iPhone’s recording of location information in a hidden file on the device, later stored on iTunes on a PC, has been known for some time, and that the information has, on some occasions, been used by law enforcement agencies in investigations.

“This data that was supposedly discovered yesterday has existed in earlier iPhones,” said Alex Levinson of Katana Forensics, a company that specializes in extracting data from electronic devices for legal cases. Mr. Levinson said that he and colleagues had explained Apple’s practices at conferences and in research papers, and that his firm has helped law enforcement agencies “harvest geolocational evidence from iOS devices,” a reference to the Apple operating system.

Mr. Levinson said that an update to Apple’s operating system changed the location of the file storing the information, but that the file had existed previously.

Security experts say law enforcement agencies can often get more precise location information from cellphone carriers than from the hidden file.

While privacy advocates and many iPhone users were alarmed by the revelations, Mr. Levinson and other security experts said they suspected that Apple had been using the data to be able to pinpoint a phone’s location more quickly, saving bandwidth and battery life, when their owners used location-based services like maps and navigation.

Still, the controversy has been magnified by Apple’s silence. For the second day, the company did not respond to calls and e-mails seeking comment.

But in a letter sent by Apple in July to two congressmen — Edward J. Markey, Democrat of Massachusetts, and Joe L. Barton, Republican of Texas — the company appeared to confirm that it has been storing and collecting location information for some time.

In the letter, Apple said it collects the location data anonymously and only when consumers agree to use its location-based services like maps, or any apps that ask a user’s location, and for its advertising system, iAds. The company said that it has been offering location-based services since 2008, but that only in 2010, when it released iOS 3.2, did it begin relying on its own databases for those services. Explaining its need to collect data from its customers’ phones, Apple wrote, “These databases must be updated continuously.”

Security experts say companies like Apple and Google collect the location of Wi-Fi networks and cell towers to pinpoint the location of phones without using GPS technology. Some suggested Apple was doing so through the users of its iPhones.

 

 

Mark Seiden, an information security consultant in Silicon Valley, said that Apple’s letter to the congressmen suggests that it uses the location data from the previously hidden file “so a phone knows where it is quickly.” Mr. Seiden said that Apple did not appear to be using the data to track people, but that the company should probably be more diligent about deleting dated location information. “I don’t know why they would want to keep old data on the device,” he said.

Mr. Markey on Thursday sent a follow-up letter to Apple asking it to explain why it was storing the information in the user’s device, and raising concern that its actions could violate the Communications Act.

“Apple needs to safeguard the personal location information of its users to ensure that an iPhone doesn’t become an iTrack,” Mr. Markey said in a statement. On Wednesday, Senator Al Franken, Democrat of Minnesota, also sent a letter asking Apple for an explanation.

The controversy erupted on Wednesday, when two computer programmers issued a report at a conference in San Francisco describing the files with the hidden data. The programmers also released a program that allowed users to see their stored location data on a map.

Some privacy experts were particularly concerned that the files were not encrypted, and that they were backed up on users’ computers.

The concerns quickly spread to Europe, where privacy laws are typically stricter than in the United States.

The Bavarian Agency for the Supervision of Data Protection, in Germany, said it would examine whether — and if so, why — the iPhone and iPad were storing such user data. Thomas Kranig, the director of the agency, said his office had asked Apple whether geographic information was being stored and for what purpose.

“If it’s true that this information is being collected, and it is being done without the approval and knowledge of the users, then it is definitely a violation of German privacy law,” Mr. Kranig said.

The Italian Data Protection Authority also opened an investigation into Apple’s data collection, expanding one it had begun on how mobile applications process personal data, Reuters reported.

France may follow suit. Yann Padova, the secretary general of CNIL, the French data protection authority, said the agency was trying to verify the report by the American programmers.

The French agency plans to send Apple France a letter asking for an explanation next week, Mr. Padova said. A major concern will be whether the information remained on the device or whether it was transferred by Apple to one of its commercial partners.

“In the first case, it is a matter of simply not obtaining the consent of  the consumer for the data to be collected,” Mr. Padova said. “In the second case, if the information is marketed without the knowledge of the consumer, it is much more serious.”

Source: New York Times

Apple patches Pwn2Own iPhone OS vulnerabilities

Apple has released a critical update for its flagship iOS mobile operating system to fix several gaping security holes, including a few that were used in successful exploits at this year’s CanSecWest Pwn2Own contest.

The new iOS 4.3.2 software update, which is available for download via iTunes, provides cover for five documented security problems, including vulnerabilities exploited by Charlie Miller (iPhone) and a team of researchers who broke into RIM’s BlackBerry smartphone.

The raw details:

  • QuickLook: A memory corruption issue existed in QuickLook’s handling of Microsoft Office files. Viewing a maliciously crafted Microsoft Office file may lead to an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution. Credit to Charlie Miller and Dion Blazakis working with TippingPoint’s Zero Day Initiative.
  • WebKit: An integer overflow issue existed in the handling of nodesets. Visiting a maliciously crafted website may lead to an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution. Credit to Vincenzo Iozzo, Willem Pinckaers, Ralf-Philipp Weinmann, and an anonymous researcher working with TippingPoint’s Zero Day Initiative.
  • WebKit: A use after free issue existed in the handling of text nodes. Visiting a maliciously crafted website may lead to an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution. Credit to Vupen Security working with TippingPoint’s Zero Day Initiative, and Martin Barbella.

The iOS update also fixes the Comodo certificate trust policy problem that allowed an attacker with a privileged network position to intercept user credentials or other sensitive information.   This issue was also fixed in separate Safari and Mac OS X updates.

Source: ZDNet