Tag Archive: iphone repairs abbotsford


Here Is How Hackers Can Spy On Your MacBook Camera

Just a few months ago, a story broke about how Samsung smart TVs were susceptible to remote spying by users that hack into the built-in camera. Now, new research demonstrates that MacBook webcams are just as susceptible to being hacked and spied-on as televisions.

Researchers at John Hopkins University discovered exactly how the hacking process is possible without signaling for the light adjacent to the camera to turn on, which is usually an indication that the camera is on.

The primary researcher, computer science professor Stephen Checkoway, published a paper in conjunction with graduate student Matthew Brocker entitled “iSeeYou: Disabling the MacBook Webcam Indicator LED” that contains the detailed process of remotely spying on others’ laptops. Although the researchers could only prove their methods worked with MacBooks created before 2008, they suggest that the process could be successfully repeated with newer computers.

The Washington Post recently ran an article detailing the story of Miss Teen USA Cassidy Wolf, who received nude photographs of herself via email. After an FBI investigation, the authorities discovered that Wolf’s former high school classmate Jared Abrahams had hacked into her computer, as well as the computers of several other women, and had been spying on them via their webcam.

The case of Wolf as well as the new research from John Hopkins raises several issues about privacy and security in the modern world. While Apple’s light was intended as a security feature to alert users when their camera was on, it appears that hackers have found an easily solution to disable that feature. According to The Washington Post, the FBI has been using similar hacking technology for years.

Source: PRPick.com

Canada’s new wireless rules are great, but let’s not kid ourselves

The CRTC, determined to reform Canada’s usurious wireless phone cartel, has just issued a strict new “Code of Conduct.”

Effective this December, three-year phone contracts will be available, but unenforceable. If you’re stuck in one of these abusive long-term relationships, you’ll be able to sever it at the two-year mark without penalty.

You know those bill-shocker stories about customers getting hit with thousands of dollars in data overage fees after letting their kids watch YouTube on their iPhones while vacationing in Cuba? Roaming data overage will now be limited to $100 a month, domestic to $50.

You’ll be able to have your subsidized phone unlocked after 90 days, you’ll have a right to a simpler contract and you’ll be able to negotiate changes to that contract.

Hooray, right?

Yes and no. The CRTC’s new pro-consumer stance is, without question, a good thing. But our big three carriers (Bell, Rogers and Telus) still control 95 per cent of the mobile market. Canadians are not going to start using less mobile anytime soon, regardless of the terms we’re offered. In fact, a wireless industry lobby group just sponsored a major study which (they claim) proves that Canadians are actually willing to pay more than we already do for our smart phones. Industry lobbiests are already using the report to suggest that Canadian consumers are getting a bargain. I say charging $50 for an umbrella during a thunderstorm isn’t a good deal just because people would still buy them at $60.

The point is, if the big three can’t maintain their globally-envied RPUs (revenue per user) under the old rules, they’ll find other ways to keep profits up while colouring within the lines of the new ones.

What will that mean? You can expect monthly fees to climb, and new “bonus” add-ons to be fabricated  marketed. We already see carriers offering 4G speed-upgrades — for a fee. I predict that any new speed capacity will be chopped into separate products at separate price points, in a move akin to offering regular, premium and super-premium gasoline. That’s off the top of my head. If there are other ways to sneak new costs into our bills, wireless companies will find them.

The missing ingredient in Canadian wireless is not a tough regulator, but tough competition, backed by unrestrained foreign investment. However, even if Ottawa steps in to untangle the red tape and make this possible, our international reputation may be too tarnished. After the recent experiences of Mobilicity and Wind, who felt “left to the dogs” by Canada’s government once they were wooed in, the Canadian market may be a no-go zone for international mobile firms.

All around the world, smart phones are getting cheaper, wireless speeds are getting faster and people are doing more and more new things with their mobile devices. It’s happening here too. Just less so.

Ryan:  Having worked for the big 3 (Rogers, TELUS & Bell) I can speak on behalf of most Canadians by stating that this is a positive step in the right direction.  Now they just need to adjust the price fixing problems / incorrect roaming bills.  Why not just shut off service to phones when a certain point is reached? Why are we as Canadians still paying for Call Display / Voicemail?  

Source: Maclean’s

New chip could lead to era of ultra-fast, powerful computing

A group of scientists have developed a quantum computer chip that could lead to ultra-fast computer processors, which would outperform those found in today’s standard electronics and smartphones.

The group, led by researchers from the University of Bristol’s Centre for Photonics, will unveil the new silicon quantum chip at the 2012 British Science Festival, which starts Tuesday.

The new silicon chips are significant because they work by manipulating light particles to perform calculations, an improvement over current chips that use electrical currents.

The new chips are also 1,000 times smaller than older chips made of glass, and could eventually be used to develop tiny hybrid processors – a mix of conventional and quantum processors — in all computers and smartphones.

The centre’s deputy director Mark Thompson said the development of the new, smaller chips means researchers can use the technology in devices that were previously not compatible with older chips.

This means new areas of science can be explored, said Thompson.

“This is very much the start of a new field of quantum-engineering, where state-of-the-art micro-chip manufacturing techniques are used to develop new quantum technologies and will eventually realize quantum computers that will help us understand the most complex scientific problems,” he said in a press release.

One way the team plans to use the new chips is to create safer communication in today’s electronic devices, by creating completely secure environments for online activities such as shopping and banking.

The new chips transmit information in a specialized quantum state that changes whenever someone tries to intercept the data. This makes it impossible for someone to grab information undetected. And because of their tiny size, the chips could eventually be installed in today’s thin smartphones, tablets and computers, protecting the devices from hackers.

Eventually the research team believes the new chip will lead to the development of a fully-functioning quantum processor — a powerful type of computer with unprecedented computing power. A quantum computing device is powerful enough to solve trillions of equations at a time.

A quantum processor could used be in a number of different applications, including the design of new materials and pharmaceuticals.

Source: Bristol University News