Tag Archive: Chilliwack iPhone Repair


Just a quick update for our clients in the Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland – Even though we are tucked away we have the BIGGEST selection of WHOLESALE priced accessories. All Blue tagged items take an additional 25% OFF.  The sales starts on December 14th and goes all the way until December 28th!  What does that mean?  Our already low prices are an additional 25 PERCENT OFF!  Most of the cool stuff will have the blue tag discount so get here quick before everything is sold out!  Happy Holidays and a VERY Merry Christmas to all my friends that continue to support our business!

For our iphone 5/5s/5C/6/6 Plus Customers – Mention this and get a FREE case with your cell phone screen repair!  THIS OFFER IS VALID UNTIL DECEMBER 31ST!

For anyone unlocking their smartphone or iPhone on UnlockMyPhone.ca our unlocking website, use promo code “5OFFUNLOCK” for an additonal $5 dollars off any unlock code or iPhone factory unlock!

 

We get lots of customers calling to ask us if we do cell phone and smart phone repair, most frequently iPhone repair.  Yes indeed we do all major cell phone repairs for most makes and models including Apple, HTC, Samsung, Motorola, Huawei, BlackBerry and Sony Ericsson.  Unlike most of the repair shops in town just doing simple iPhone repairs like glass screens, we provide our clients extremely technical repairs most shops turn down.  We also provide our customers with pickup and drop off services in case they can’t make it in to the shop.  Our clients always get a 6 month warranty on the parts and labour so you can trust your getting the best quality parts and service in town.

We also repair all iPad, iPad Mini and iPad Air Glass Screen or LCD’s, Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 or 3 Glass or LCD Replacement, Charging Port Replacements, Battery Replacements, Antenna Repairs, Dead Motherboard Repairs, JTAG Repair Services and so much more!  Call us today! (778) 245-0780.

 

Critical crypto bug leaves Linux, hundreds of apps open to eavesdropping

Hundreds of open source packages, including the Red Hat, Ubuntu, and Debian distributions of Linux, are susceptible to attacks that circumvent the most widely used technology to prevent eavesdropping on the Internet, thanks to an extremely critical vulnerability in a widely used cryptographic code library.

The bug in the GnuTLS library makes it trivial for attackers to bypass secure sockets layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS) protections available on websites that depend on the open source package. Initial estimates included in Internet discussions such as this one indicate that more than 200 different operating systems or applications rely on GnuTLS to implement crucial SSL and TLS operations, but it wouldn’t be surprising if the actual number is much higher. Web applications, e-mail programs, and other code that use the library are vulnerable to exploits that allow attackers monitoring connections to silently decode encrypted traffic passing between end users and servers.

The bug is the result of commands in a section of the GnuTLS code that verify the authenticity of TLS certificates, which are often known simply as X509 certificates. The coding error, which may have been present in the code since 2005, causes critical verification checks to be terminated, drawing ironic parallels to the extremely critical “goto fail” flaw that for months put users of Apple’s iOS and OS X operating systems at risk of surreptitious eavesdropping attacks. Apple developers have since patched the bug.

“It was discovered that GnuTLS did not correctly handle certain errors that could occur during the verification of an X.509 certificate, causing it to incorrectly report a successful verification,” an advisory issued by Red Hat warned. “An attacker could use this flaw to create a specially crafted certificate that could be accepted by GnuTLS as valid for a site chosen by the attacker.”

GnuTLS developers published this bare-bones advisory that urges all users to upgrade to version 3.2.12. The flaw, formally indexed as CVE-2014-0092, is described by a GnuTLS developer as “an important (and at the same time embarrassing) bug discovered during an audit for Red Hat.” Debian’s advisory is here.

As was the case with last week’s critical encryption bug from Apple, the GnuTLS vulnerability is the result of someone making mistakes in source code that controls critical functions of the program. This time, instead of a single misplaced “goto fail” command, the mistakes involve errors with several “goto cleanup” calls. The GnuTLS program, in turn, prematurely terminates code sections that are supposed to establish secure TLS connections only after the other side presents a valid X509 certificate signed by a trusted source. Attackers can exploit the error by presenting vulnerable systems with a fraudulent certificate that is never rejected, despite its failure to pass routine security checks. The failure may allow attackers using a self-signed certificate to pose as the cryptographically authenticated operator of a vulnerable website and to decrypt protected communications. It’s significant that no one managed to notice such glaring errors, particularly since they were contained in code that anyone can review.

Security researchers are still studying the vulnerability and assessing its effect on the wide array of OSes and applications that depend on GnuTLS. For the moment, readers should assume that the severity is critical given the dizzying amount of downstream code that may be affected. One example: the apt-get installer some distributions of Linux use to distribute and update applications relies on GnuTLS, although exploits against the package can probably be caught by cryptographic code-signing of the downloaded program (thanks to readers for pointing out this secondary level of protection). Version 3 of lib-curl, which is distributed in Debian and Ubuntu, also depends on GnuTLS. Some Debian- and Ubuntu-based virtual private networking applications that work with Cisco Systems hardware are also affected. This list goes on and on.

Source: ArsTechnica

Here Is How Hackers Can Spy On Your MacBook Camera

Just a few months ago, a story broke about how Samsung smart TVs were susceptible to remote spying by users that hack into the built-in camera. Now, new research demonstrates that MacBook webcams are just as susceptible to being hacked and spied-on as televisions.

Researchers at John Hopkins University discovered exactly how the hacking process is possible without signaling for the light adjacent to the camera to turn on, which is usually an indication that the camera is on.

The primary researcher, computer science professor Stephen Checkoway, published a paper in conjunction with graduate student Matthew Brocker entitled “iSeeYou: Disabling the MacBook Webcam Indicator LED” that contains the detailed process of remotely spying on others’ laptops. Although the researchers could only prove their methods worked with MacBooks created before 2008, they suggest that the process could be successfully repeated with newer computers.

The Washington Post recently ran an article detailing the story of Miss Teen USA Cassidy Wolf, who received nude photographs of herself via email. After an FBI investigation, the authorities discovered that Wolf’s former high school classmate Jared Abrahams had hacked into her computer, as well as the computers of several other women, and had been spying on them via their webcam.

The case of Wolf as well as the new research from John Hopkins raises several issues about privacy and security in the modern world. While Apple’s light was intended as a security feature to alert users when their camera was on, it appears that hackers have found an easily solution to disable that feature. According to The Washington Post, the FBI has been using similar hacking technology for years.

Source: PRPick.com

Missing Xbox One Dolby audio options coming post-launch

The Xbox One will add support for Dolby 5.1 and 7.1 digital audio through a post-launch patch, director of product planning Albert Penello said today.

“Dolby Digital is coming post launch,” Penello said on NeoGAF. “This was a [software] scheduling issue pure and simple, and I know people are disappointed, but we will have it.”

No timetable for the patch’s release was provided. This means that until the Xbox One audio patch is released, Microsoft’s next-generation system is not capable of doing optical audio on the level of the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, or PlayStation 4.

Penello explained that anyone with an HDMI receiver “should be fine” because uncompressed 5.1 and 7.1 audio is passed through HDMI and DTS.

“Even if you have a Dolby only HDMI receiver (which I’m not sure exists), you will still get 5.1 or 7.1 sound since those receivers should accept uncompressed surround,” he said.

For Dolby-only headsets, Penello said he understands that these should work on Xbox One from launch, though users will only receive stereo audio.

“I have not tested this myself, but I’m told it works. Regardless, I understand this is an inconvenience, but again we’re going to have Dolby coming,” he said.

Headset company Astro, which said previously that its products would work without issue on Xbox One, released a statement on the matter following Microsoft’s announcement, confirming that because the Xbox One will not have Dolby support at launch, there will be ramifications for Astro products.

“While our products do not process DTS signals, we do have on-board Dolby encoding in both our A50 Wireless Transmitter as well as our Wired MixAmp Pro. An Xbox One gamer will need to select Stereo output for game audio, but our MixAmps will process that stereo signal with Dolby ProLogic II and encode it with Dolby Headphone,” the company said.

 

Source: GameSpot