Tag Archive: abbotsford iphone repair


Just a quick update for our clients in the Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland – Even though we are tucked away we have the BIGGEST selection of WHOLESALE priced accessories. All Blue tagged items take an additional 25% OFF.  The sales starts on December 14th and goes all the way until December 28th!  What does that mean?  Our already low prices are an additional 25 PERCENT OFF!  Most of the cool stuff will have the blue tag discount so get here quick before everything is sold out!  Happy Holidays and a VERY Merry Christmas to all my friends that continue to support our business!

For our iphone 5/5s/5C/6/6 Plus Customers – Mention this and get a FREE case with your cell phone screen repair!  THIS OFFER IS VALID UNTIL DECEMBER 31ST!

For anyone unlocking their smartphone or iPhone on UnlockMyPhone.ca our unlocking website, use promo code “5OFFUNLOCK” for an additonal $5 dollars off any unlock code or iPhone factory unlock!

 

We get lots of customers calling to ask us if we do cell phone and smart phone repair, most frequently iPhone repair.  Yes indeed we do all major cell phone repairs for most makes and models including Apple, HTC, Samsung, Motorola, Huawei, BlackBerry and Sony Ericsson.  Unlike most of the repair shops in town just doing simple iPhone repairs like glass screens, we provide our clients extremely technical repairs most shops turn down.  We also provide our customers with pickup and drop off services in case they can’t make it in to the shop.  Our clients always get a 6 month warranty on the parts and labour so you can trust your getting the best quality parts and service in town.

We also repair all iPad, iPad Mini and iPad Air Glass Screen or LCD’s, Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 or 3 Glass or LCD Replacement, Charging Port Replacements, Battery Replacements, Antenna Repairs, Dead Motherboard Repairs, JTAG Repair Services and so much more!  Call us today! (778) 245-0780.

 

Is Aliyun OS really Linux? Android? A rip-off of both?

When Acer was ready to announce a new smartphone running Alibaba’s Aliyun operating system, Google responded with force. If it were to be released, Google would end its parternship with Acer, which uses Android for 90 percent of its smartphones.

Acer swiftly cancelled the release, but clearly Acer wasn’t happy about the state of affairs. Alibaba, China’s largest e-commerce company, was even less happy.

Alibaba says it wants Aliyun OS to be the “Android of China,” claimign that they’ve spent years working on their Linux-based mobile operating system.

Google didn’t see it that way. Google thinks Alibaba is an Android rip-off.

In Google’s Android Official Blog, Andy Rubin, Google’s senior vice president of mobile and digital content said:

“We built Android to be an open source mobile platform freely available to anyone wishing to use it. In 2008, Android was released under the Apache open source license and we continue to develop and innovate the platform under the same open source license — it is available to everyone at: http://source.android.com. This openness allows device manufacturers to customize Android and enable new user experiences, driving innovation and consumer choice.”

But: “While Android remains free for anyone to use as they would like, only Android compatible devices benefit from the full Android ecosystem. By joining the Open Handset Alliance (OHA), each member contributes to and builds one Android platform — not a bunch of incompatible versions.”

Android is a mobile operating system branch of Linux. While there have been disagreements between developers, Android and mainstream Linux buried the hatchet in March 2012.

So, from where Google sits, Aliyun OS is an incompatible Android fork.  John Spelich, Alibaba vice president of international corporate affairs replied oddly: “[Google] have no idea and are just speculating. Aliyun is different.”

How can Google have no idea about what Aliyun is if it is indeed, as Alibaba claims, a Linux fork? Linux is licensed under the GNU General Public License, version 2 (GPLv2). Part of that license insists that if a GPLv2 program is released to general users, the source code must be made publicly available. Thus, perhaps Google doesn’t have any idea because, as Spelich indidicted and far as I’ve been able to find, Aliyun’s source code is not available anywhere. If indeed the source code isn’t open and freely available, even if Aliyun has no Android connection, this would still make it an illegal Linux fork.

Spelich went on to claim that Aliyun is “not a fork,” adding: “Ours is built on open-source Linux.” In addition, Aliyon runs “our own applications. It’s designed to run cloud apps designed in our own ecosystem. It can run some but not all Android apps.”

Rubin, in a Google+ post, replied, “We agree that the Aliyun OS is not part of the Android ecosystem and you’re under no requirement to be compatible.”

“However, ” he continued, “[t]he fact is, Aliyun uses the Android runtime, framework and tools. And your app store contains Android apps (including pirated Google apps). So there’s really no disputing that Aliyun is based on the Android platform and takes advantage of all the hard work that’s gone into that platform by the OHA.”

Hands on research by Android Police, a publication dedicated to Android reporting and analysis, shows that Aliyun app store includes pirated Google apps.

Android Police found that, “Aliyun’s app store appeared to be distributing Android apps scraped from the Play Store and other websites, not only downloadable to Aliyun devices as .apk files, but also provided by third parties not involved with the apps’ or games’ development. What’s more, we’ve received independent confirmation from the original developers of some of these apps that they did not in fact give consent for their products to be distributed in Aliyun’s app store.”

Not the least of the evidence is that the Aliyun includes Google’s own Android applications such as Google Translate, Google Sky Map, Google Drive, and Google Play Books. The odds of Google giving Aliyun permission to use its own applications are somewhere zero and none.

What we seem to have in Aliyun is an illegal Android and Linux fork, which supports a pirated software ecosystem. I only wonder that Google didn’t come down even harder on Acer and I really wonder how much due diligence, if any, Acer did before signing a deal with Alibaba.

Source: ZDNet