Category: Reviews


Here’s why many people want their BlackBerrys back after switching to iOS and Android

Following the release of the original iPhone in 2007 and the subsequent launch of Android, many people with work-issued phones spent years asking for their employers to switch away from BlackBerry smartphones to more modern devices. Finally, as Apple and Google increased their focus on security and BlackBerry hit dire straights a few years ago, workers began getting what that wanted and bring your own device (BYOD) policies became more common.

More recently, however, an interesting trend is being observed: Workers want their BlackBerry’s back.

CIO’s Tom Kaneshige reports on an interesting phenomenon that we’ve heard rumblings of in the past. At companies where employees were permitted to ditch their work-issued BlackBerry phones and bring their own iPhones and Android handsets, they’re now begging their IT departments to move back to BlackBerry.

Why? It turns out there are a few reasons.

For one thing, there are privacy concerns. When workers use their own iOS and Android devices, IT departments gain access to all of their private data in addition to any corporate apps that might be on the devices. It’s never a good thing when you have to hand over a smartphone packed full of naked selfies so that IT can fix an issue with email not syncing properly.

Beyond that, IT professionals Kaneshige spoke with say they are having some serious problems with mobile device management (MDM) software, and the related on-device apps often cause issues like battery drain and device bogging.

Source: BGR

Here Is How Hackers Can Spy On Your MacBook Camera

Just a few months ago, a story broke about how Samsung smart TVs were susceptible to remote spying by users that hack into the built-in camera. Now, new research demonstrates that MacBook webcams are just as susceptible to being hacked and spied-on as televisions.

Researchers at John Hopkins University discovered exactly how the hacking process is possible without signaling for the light adjacent to the camera to turn on, which is usually an indication that the camera is on.

The primary researcher, computer science professor Stephen Checkoway, published a paper in conjunction with graduate student Matthew Brocker entitled “iSeeYou: Disabling the MacBook Webcam Indicator LED” that contains the detailed process of remotely spying on others’ laptops. Although the researchers could only prove their methods worked with MacBooks created before 2008, they suggest that the process could be successfully repeated with newer computers.

The Washington Post recently ran an article detailing the story of Miss Teen USA Cassidy Wolf, who received nude photographs of herself via email. After an FBI investigation, the authorities discovered that Wolf’s former high school classmate Jared Abrahams had hacked into her computer, as well as the computers of several other women, and had been spying on them via their webcam.

The case of Wolf as well as the new research from John Hopkins raises several issues about privacy and security in the modern world. While Apple’s light was intended as a security feature to alert users when their camera was on, it appears that hackers have found an easily solution to disable that feature. According to The Washington Post, the FBI has been using similar hacking technology for years.

Source: PRPick.com

Missing Xbox One Dolby audio options coming post-launch

The Xbox One will add support for Dolby 5.1 and 7.1 digital audio through a post-launch patch, director of product planning Albert Penello said today.

“Dolby Digital is coming post launch,” Penello said on NeoGAF. “This was a [software] scheduling issue pure and simple, and I know people are disappointed, but we will have it.”

No timetable for the patch’s release was provided. This means that until the Xbox One audio patch is released, Microsoft’s next-generation system is not capable of doing optical audio on the level of the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, or PlayStation 4.

Penello explained that anyone with an HDMI receiver “should be fine” because uncompressed 5.1 and 7.1 audio is passed through HDMI and DTS.

“Even if you have a Dolby only HDMI receiver (which I’m not sure exists), you will still get 5.1 or 7.1 sound since those receivers should accept uncompressed surround,” he said.

For Dolby-only headsets, Penello said he understands that these should work on Xbox One from launch, though users will only receive stereo audio.

“I have not tested this myself, but I’m told it works. Regardless, I understand this is an inconvenience, but again we’re going to have Dolby coming,” he said.

Headset company Astro, which said previously that its products would work without issue on Xbox One, released a statement on the matter following Microsoft’s announcement, confirming that because the Xbox One will not have Dolby support at launch, there will be ramifications for Astro products.

“While our products do not process DTS signals, we do have on-board Dolby encoding in both our A50 Wireless Transmitter as well as our Wired MixAmp Pro. An Xbox One gamer will need to select Stereo output for game audio, but our MixAmps will process that stereo signal with Dolby ProLogic II and encode it with Dolby Headphone,” the company said.

 

Source: GameSpot