Category: Repairs


Hey Everyone,

It’s been a very busy start to the new year for our shop, we have been doing a tremendous amount of iMac and Macbook Repair over the last year and we would like to let everyone know who keeps asking, we DO repair all iMac and Macbook computers and ALL Apple products including iPod (All Models) and iPad.  Ask about getting you iMac Hard Drive replaced to a Solid State Drive (SSD) and a full tune up including internal and external cleaning.  If you’ve had your mac longer then 3 years chances are its super dusty inside and will need to be cleaned internally!

We offer a complete Mac-Tune-Up Package with Sierra OS installed and your option of a 120GB, 240GB, 480GB or 1TB SSD upgrade which will make your computer  respond much faster (apps open quicker, shorters boot/reboot times) + a HUGE LIST of apps to choose from!

We hope everyone has an awesome 2017 – All the best to you and your loved ones! – Ryan

Just a quick update for our clients in the Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland – Even though we are tucked away we have the BIGGEST selection of WHOLESALE priced accessories. All Blue tagged items take an additional 25% OFF.  The sales starts on December 14th and goes all the way until December 28th!  What does that mean?  Our already low prices are an additional 25 PERCENT OFF!  Most of the cool stuff will have the blue tag discount so get here quick before everything is sold out!  Happy Holidays and a VERY Merry Christmas to all my friends that continue to support our business!

For our iphone 5/5s/5C/6/6 Plus Customers – Mention this and get a FREE case with your cell phone screen repair!  THIS OFFER IS VALID UNTIL DECEMBER 31ST!

For anyone unlocking their smartphone or iPhone on UnlockMyPhone.ca our unlocking website, use promo code “5OFFUNLOCK” for an additonal $5 dollars off any unlock code or iPhone factory unlock!

 

We get lots of customers calling to ask us if we do cell phone and smart phone repair, most frequently iPhone repair.  Yes indeed we do all major cell phone repairs for most makes and models including Apple, HTC, Samsung, Motorola, Huawei, BlackBerry and Sony Ericsson.  Unlike most of the repair shops in town just doing simple iPhone repairs like glass screens, we provide our clients extremely technical repairs most shops turn down.  We also provide our customers with pickup and drop off services in case they can’t make it in to the shop.  Our clients always get a 6 month warranty on the parts and labour so you can trust your getting the best quality parts and service in town.

We also repair all iPad, iPad Mini and iPad Air Glass Screen or LCD’s, Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 or 3 Glass or LCD Replacement, Charging Port Replacements, Battery Replacements, Antenna Repairs, Dead Motherboard Repairs, JTAG Repair Services and so much more!  Call us today! (778) 245-0780.

 

For all my clients coming from Chilliwack  and Hope – there is now an incentive to come to our shop!  Not only will we beat ANY and ALL price quotes from all Chilliwack iPhone repair shops.  We guarantee our parts are real OEM and not knockoff like we have been seeing a lot of from out that way.  Ask about our free gift with purchase! (Mention this Blog Post)

One customer named Bob came in earlier today and mentioned he has been to another iPhone repair place in Chilliwack on Unsworth.  His screen lasted two days after the replacement was put in, upon further inspection, we informed Bob the part was a fake knockoff and very low quality.. The screen wasn’t even set properly and was practically coming off the LCD.  UV glue was not properly used.

At Ryan’s PC Repair Shop, we provide our customers with real original OEM parts (You get what you pay for), a 6 month warranty on the parts and labour and after sale service you can always depend on.  Ryan’s been in the industry for over 10 years and fix just about any issue you may have.

If you’ve been to another shop and they’ve told you the phones not repairable, bring it by my shop and I’ll get it working for you.  There is no charge to look at the device if its not repairable! No diagnostic fees charged ever!

iPad is an iFAD: Now we know why Apple went running to IBM

Apple fell over itself to talk up strong Mac and iOS device sales in its latest quarter – but the real news is a slump in iPad numbers.

The Cupertino giant said the three-month period ending June 28 was its best ever fiscal third quarter on record. Its $37.4bn revenues, up six per cent year on year, led to a $7.7bn net income up from $6.9bn a year ago [PDF]. Apple’s $1.28 profit per diluted share, up from $1.07 in Q3 fiscal 2013, was slightly above Yahoo! Finance and Marketwatch average estimate of $1.23.

Boss Tim Cook said that the best-ever Q3 report was driven in part by Mac and iPhone sales, which were also records for that quarterly period. Apple said that it sold 35.2m iPhones (up 13 per cent), bagging $19.75bn in revenue (up nine per cent), and 4.4m Macs (up 18 per cent), bringing home $5.5bn (up 13 per cent).

Though iPhone and Mac sales were strong, the iPad had a rough quarter as tablet revenues at Apple were down 8 per cent, year on year, to $5.8bn from 13.2m units sold (down 9 per cent). Cook credited the drop in part to inventory reduction over the quarter.

The Apple CEO also expressed hope that the iPad business will be bolstered by the recently announced mobile mega-deal with IBM. He noted that the partnership with Big Blue will allow for tablet-specific apps to be written rather than just adapted from desktop software.

“We think there is a substantial upside in business,” Cook said.

“We think that the core thing that unleashes this is a better go-to-market, but even more importantly, apps that are written with mobile first in mind.”

Apple’s CEO is also hoping to get a boost from the company’s developer and content partners on its iTunes and App Store services. The company reported $4.4bn in quarterly revenues from the iTunes, Software and Services unit, up 12 per cent on Q3 fiscal 2013.

Cook said that over its life to date, the App Store has served up 75 billion downloads and paid out $20bn in revenues to app developers.

As for revenues broken down by region, China romped home with 28 per cent growth on Q3 fiscal 2013; the Americas and Japan has flat revenue growth, year on year, of one per cent; and Europe and the rest of the Asia Pacific grew six per cent. Retail store sales were also flat at one per cent, year on year.

The Apple head honcho also talked up the coming tie-up with Beats Electronics, which is set to become the 30th Apple acquisition of the year when it is expected to close in the coming quarter.

With the back-to-school shopping season kicking off and the release of OS X Yosemite and iOS 8 looming, Apple is predicting an even stronger quarter, ending late September. The biz is estimating that its Q4 numbers will see revenues between $37bn and $40bn, putting the company on track to surpass $175bn in revenues for the full fiscal year.

Source: The Register

The Heartbleed bug: Am I at risk and do I really have to change my password?

The discovery of Heartbleed, a flaw in one of the most widespread encryption standards used online, has panicked webmasters and users alike.

The bug has gone unnoticed for more than two years and could have potentially given hackers access to an unlimited array of secure data — everything from passwords and login details to credit card numbers and addresses.

Although it’s difficult to say exactly how many websites have been exposed, the lower estimates are around 500 million with a large number of major web companies (Google, Facebook, Yahoo, etc) all forced to update their software to protect against the bug.

However, there have been quite a lot of mixed messages as to whether or not users should change their passwords, with some outlets urging that you should create new ones immediately while others are advising that you wait.

To add to the confusion there’s also been reports of hackers sending out phishing emails related to Heartbleed — in order to trick users into giving up passwords that have yet to be compromised. Be on the look out for these and don’t follow any links in suspicious looking emails – if you want to change a password go to the site directly.

Which sites are affected?
Most Google sites and services (including Gmail and YouTube – but not Chrome) were affected, as were sites maintained by Yahoo (including Tumblr and Flickr). Facebook was also hit by the bug although Twitter and LinkedIn were not.

Other big sites that have confirmed that they weren’t affected include Amazon, Hotmail and Outlook, eBay, PayPal and all of Apple’s properties — including iCloud and iTunes. If you want to check whether or not a site you use is still affected then you can do so here — just enter the URL.

Another big worry is for online banking, but thankfully we have some good news in that department. Lloyds, HSBC, RBS, Natwest, Santander and the Co-Op have all confirmed that they were not affected by the bug (they were using different encryption standards). Barclays has yet to issue a statement.

However, this does not mean that your credit card details are completely safe — as they could have been compromised via your Gmail or another third-party site. The security of mobile banking apps is still a developing situation as well.

So do I need to change my passwords?
In a word: Yes. For the sites we’ve listed above as being affected (including Gmail, Yahoo, Tumblr, Flickr, Facebook) it definitely won’t hurt to change your password some time in the next couple of weeks.

Although security experts have warned that you shouldn’t be too quick to change passwords, this is because not all website have patched their servers and changing your password before this happens could make matters worse. The sites we’ve listed above have patched their servers and if you want to check one we’ve not mentioned — click here and enter the URL.

Unfortunately, some sites (including Google) have specifically said that users don’t need to change their passwords. While it’s true that some sites are confident that they fixed the bug a while back, as most of us are guilty of changing our passwords less frequently than we should do (aka never) we think that this is as good an opportunity as ever to be a bit more security-conscious.

What should my new password be?
In lists of the most frequently used passwords online there’s some obvious clangers that we know you’re too smart to use (these include old standbys such as ‘123456’ and ‘password’ itself) but just because a password doesn’t look obvious to you that doesn’t make it safe.

This means that you shouldn’t really use any single words that are found in the dictionary, any words connected to you (place of birth or pets’ names), nor should you use any obvious ‘substitutions’ (eg pa55w0rd — more complicated variations are required) or patterns derived from your keyboard layout (eg ‘1qaz2wsx’ or ‘zxcvbnm’).

It’s wise to use a variety of characters in your password (including upper and lower case as well as numbers) but an easy way to get more secure is to start thinking of your password as a passphrase.

The easiest way of increasing the difficulty of a password is by simply making it longer — so try combining multiple words together and then adding in numbers between them.

You could pick a number of some significance to you (for example a loved one’s birthday, ie 12/08/1970) and then splicing this with a nonsensical phrase (‘shoesplittingwatchwizard’) to get a suitably difficulty password: Shoe12Splitting08Watch1970Wizard.

Other suggested methods for making a strong and memorable password include taking a sentence or a favourite line from a song as a starting point. So you might take the line “When you call my name it’s like a little prayer” and turn it into wuCmNilaLP. Madonna is optional of course, but we think this a fun method — especially if you can work in numbers somewhere.

You should also use different passwords for your different accounts (perhaps the most difficult piece of advice to follow of all) and if you want to be really secure you should also set up two-step authentication where available.

Ryan says: I recommend everyone on any of the sites mentioned in this article to change their passwords ASAP.

PS4 blinking blue light fault is due to ‘TV compatibility’

PlayStation_FourSony has identified four likely reasons for the most commonly reported PlayStation 4 error, including issues with the hard drive and power supply.

Although Sony claim the failure rate for the PlayStation 4 is only 0.4 per cent if they’ve already sold over 1 million consoles in North America then that still means 4,000 faulty machines are out there in the wild.

Although reports last week, primarily from American press, suggested a problem with the HDMI output that doesn’t seem to be a factor in Sony’s latest update on the problems.

According to official PlayStation Support staff, writing on the PlayStation forums, ‘Some reports have been coming in from users with PS4 units blinking blue, but not entering the powered on state indicated by a white light’.

As well as the blue indicator light blinking, new PlayStation 4 owners have been reporting no video or audio output on their television and the console turning itself off once the light starting flashing.

This could apparently mean any of a number of things, including TV compatibility problems, issues with the PlayStation 4 power supply, issues with PlayStation 4 hard drive, and what support vaguely refer to as ‘issues with other PS4 hardware’.

They suggest that the TV compatibility issue can be resolved by updating the firmware on your TV (implying the problem is primarily with smart TVs).

The other issues are more complicated and it’s implied they may involve returning the console to Sony for repair or replacement.

There are more details at the link, but bear in mind that the contact details are for North America not Europe. So if you do have problems with your launch machine it’s best to visit the official UK support website here.

 

Researchers describe hacking iOS devices with malicious charger

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology will be demonstrating a proof-of-concept method of hacking an iPhone using a malicious USB charger. Billy Lau, Yeongjin Jang, Chengyu Song announced the demonstration for Black Hat USA 2013, an annual conference for hackers and security researchers that begins on July 27th in Las Vegas.

The short version is the three researchers found a way to use USB protocols to bypass some of Apple’s security features in iOS that prevent unauthorized software from being installed on your iOS device. The three built a charger based on a BeagleBoard (see below)—a US$125 computer-on-a-circuit-board—that was able to successfully insert malware onto an iPhone plugged into it.

Worse, they can do so in under a minute.

“Despite the plethora of defense mechanisms in iOS, we successfully injected arbitrary software into current-generation Apple devices running the latest operating system (OS) software,” the researchers wrote on their BlackHat presentation description. “All users are affected, as our approach requires neither a jailbroken device nor user interaction.”

In the demonstration, they said will discuss Apple’s existing security mechanisms that protect against “arbitrary software installation,” which in layman’s terms essentially means malware. They will then describe how standard USB capabilities can be, “leveraged to bypass these defense mechanisms.” To finish it off, they will demonstrate how this same process can be used to then hide the resulting malware from the user the same way Apple hides its own built in software.

The three researchers named their malicious charger “Mactans.”

The BeagleBoard it is based on is an off-the-shelf circuit board that can be used to create all manner of tiny computing devices running Angstrom (Open Embedded), Debian, Ubuntu, and Gentoo. There are other BeagleBoard products as well, including a slightly larger model with a 1GHz Sitara ARM Cortex-A8 processors that can run Android.

The point the researchers are making is that their method can be accomplished with readily available technology.

“While Mactans was built with limited amount of time and a small budget,” they wrote, “we also briefly consider what more motivated, well-funded adversaries could accomplish.”

The researchers will offer methods for protecting yourself against such an attack—we’ll throw out that you should probably be choosy about using a charger whose provenance you can’t verify—and what Apple can do to make this attack, “substantially more difficult to pull off.”

Source: UPI

Canada’s new wireless rules are great, but let’s not kid ourselves

The CRTC, determined to reform Canada’s usurious wireless phone cartel, has just issued a strict new “Code of Conduct.”

Effective this December, three-year phone contracts will be available, but unenforceable. If you’re stuck in one of these abusive long-term relationships, you’ll be able to sever it at the two-year mark without penalty.

You know those bill-shocker stories about customers getting hit with thousands of dollars in data overage fees after letting their kids watch YouTube on their iPhones while vacationing in Cuba? Roaming data overage will now be limited to $100 a month, domestic to $50.

You’ll be able to have your subsidized phone unlocked after 90 days, you’ll have a right to a simpler contract and you’ll be able to negotiate changes to that contract.

Hooray, right?

Yes and no. The CRTC’s new pro-consumer stance is, without question, a good thing. But our big three carriers (Bell, Rogers and Telus) still control 95 per cent of the mobile market. Canadians are not going to start using less mobile anytime soon, regardless of the terms we’re offered. In fact, a wireless industry lobby group just sponsored a major study which (they claim) proves that Canadians are actually willing to pay more than we already do for our smart phones. Industry lobbiests are already using the report to suggest that Canadian consumers are getting a bargain. I say charging $50 for an umbrella during a thunderstorm isn’t a good deal just because people would still buy them at $60.

The point is, if the big three can’t maintain their globally-envied RPUs (revenue per user) under the old rules, they’ll find other ways to keep profits up while colouring within the lines of the new ones.

What will that mean? You can expect monthly fees to climb, and new “bonus” add-ons to be fabricated  marketed. We already see carriers offering 4G speed-upgrades — for a fee. I predict that any new speed capacity will be chopped into separate products at separate price points, in a move akin to offering regular, premium and super-premium gasoline. That’s off the top of my head. If there are other ways to sneak new costs into our bills, wireless companies will find them.

The missing ingredient in Canadian wireless is not a tough regulator, but tough competition, backed by unrestrained foreign investment. However, even if Ottawa steps in to untangle the red tape and make this possible, our international reputation may be too tarnished. After the recent experiences of Mobilicity and Wind, who felt “left to the dogs” by Canada’s government once they were wooed in, the Canadian market may be a no-go zone for international mobile firms.

All around the world, smart phones are getting cheaper, wireless speeds are getting faster and people are doing more and more new things with their mobile devices. It’s happening here too. Just less so.

Ryan:  Having worked for the big 3 (Rogers, TELUS & Bell) I can speak on behalf of most Canadians by stating that this is a positive step in the right direction.  Now they just need to adjust the price fixing problems / incorrect roaming bills.  Why not just shut off service to phones when a certain point is reached? Why are we as Canadians still paying for Call Display / Voicemail?  

Source: Maclean’s

Most of you know about our PC repair services, but did you know we fix/repair/unlock cellphones & tablets? Did you also know that we offer the lowest prices in the Fraser Valley and will price match and BEAT any competitor price? Now you do.

We repair all Smartphones / iPhones for :

* Broken LCD Screens & Touch Screen Replacement
* Water and other Liquid Damage Repair / Corrosion Clean Up
* Phone Data Recovery – Photos, Music, Text Messages
* No Power / Phone does not turn on
* Charging Problems / Charging Controller / Charging Port Replacement
* Battery Replacement (200+ Batteries in stock)
* Staticky, Crackling Speakers & Microphones
* Home Button / Power Lock Button Replacement
* Malfunctioning button, Trackball, Trackpad and Keypad
* Malfunctioning SIM card readers / NO SIM Reading Fix
* Software problems, upgrades and reflashing (All Models)
* Language change
* JTAG Service (Android Phones)
* Unknown Baseband, IMEI missing
* Password Protected / Disabled Phones / Pattern Lock Reset (Samsung)
* Jailbreaking — iPhone, AppleTV 1 & 2 + FREE TV & MOVIES + FREE APPS
* Rooting — Most Android Models — Custom Rom Reflashing Available

We unlock ALL Smartphones For :

* iPhone 2G/3G/3GS (Most iOS Versions)
* iPhone 4/4S – Factory unlock Fido/Rogers/Telus/Koodo/AT&T/Bell
* iPhone 5 – Factory unlock Telus/Koodo/AT&T/Rogers/Fido
* iPhone 4S/5 unlocking for iOS 5.x, 6.1.3 and below!
* BlackBerry, Samsung, LG, HTC
* Nokia, Motorola, Sony Ericsson, Huawei, Alcatel and other Overseas Models.

– iPhone Factory unlock for USA, UK, Brazil, Australia, France, Spain, Ireland, Netherlands, Denmark, Norway, Chile, Switzerland, Sweden, Saudi Arabia, Norway, Romania, Japan, etc.

As always, we DO NOT charge for repairs that cannot be performed.

180 Warranty on ALL parts & Labour – We ONLY use OEM Factory Parts.

Call the shop if you need a price quote, make sure to ask for Ryan.

Russian BadNews bug found in Android app store

Security researchers have identified 32 separate apps on Google Play that harboured a bug called BadNews.

On infected phones, BadNews stole cash by racking up charges from sending premium rate text messages.

The malicious program lay dormant on many handsets for weeks to escape detection, said security firm Lookout which uncovered BadNews.

The malware targeted Android owners in Russia, Ukraine, Belarus and other countries in eastern Europe.

The exact numbers of victims was hard to calculate, said Lookout, adding that figures from Google Play suggest that between two and nine million copies of apps booby trapped with BadNews were downloaded from the store.

In a blogpost, Lookout said that a wide variety of apps were harbouring the BadNews malware. It found the programme lurking inside recipe generators, wallpaper apps, games and pornographic programmes.

The 32 apps were available through four separate developer accounts on Play. Google has now suspended those accounts and removed all the affected apps from its online store. No official comment from Google has yet been released.

Lookout said BadNews concealed its true identity by initially acting as an “innocent, if somewhat aggressive, advertising network”. In this guise it sent users news and information about other infected apps, and prompted people to install other programmes.

BadNews adopted this approach to avoid detection systems that look for suspicious behaviour and stop dodgy apps being installed, said Lookout.

This masquerade ended when apps seeded with BadNews got a prompt from one of three command and control servers, then it started pushing out and installing a more malicious programme called AlphaSMS. This steals credit by sending text messages to premium rate numbers.

Users were tricked into installing AlphaSMS as it was labelled as an essential update for either Skype or Russian social network Vkontakte.

Security firm Lookout said BadNews was included in many popular apps by innocent developers as it outwardly looked like a useful way to monetise their creations. It urged app makers to be more wary of such “third party tools” which they may include in their code.

Half of the 32 apps seeded with BadNews are Russian and the version of AlphaSMS it installed is tuned to use premium rate numbers in Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Armenia and Kazakhstan.

Source: BBC News