Category: Mobile


Just a quick update for our clients in the Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland – Even though we are tucked away we have the BIGGEST selection of WHOLESALE priced accessories. All Blue tagged items take an additional 25% OFF.  The sales starts on December 14th and goes all the way until December 28th!  What does that mean?  Our already low prices are an additional 25 PERCENT OFF!  Most of the cool stuff will have the blue tag discount so get here quick before everything is sold out!  Happy Holidays and a VERY Merry Christmas to all my friends that continue to support our business!

For our iphone 5/5s/5C/6/6 Plus Customers – Mention this and get a FREE case with your cell phone screen repair!  THIS OFFER IS VALID UNTIL DECEMBER 31ST!

For anyone unlocking their smartphone or iPhone on UnlockMyPhone.ca our unlocking website, use promo code “5OFFUNLOCK” for an additonal $5 dollars off any unlock code or iPhone factory unlock!

 

We get lots of customers calling to ask us if we do cell phone and smart phone repair, most frequently iPhone repair.  Yes indeed we do all major cell phone repairs for most makes and models including Apple, HTC, Samsung, Motorola, Huawei, BlackBerry and Sony Ericsson.  Unlike most of the repair shops in town just doing simple iPhone repairs like glass screens, we provide our clients extremely technical repairs most shops turn down.  We also provide our customers with pickup and drop off services in case they can’t make it in to the shop.  Our clients always get a 6 month warranty on the parts and labour so you can trust your getting the best quality parts and service in town.

We also repair all iPad, iPad Mini and iPad Air Glass Screen or LCD’s, Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 or 3 Glass or LCD Replacement, Charging Port Replacements, Battery Replacements, Antenna Repairs, Dead Motherboard Repairs, JTAG Repair Services and so much more!  Call us today! (778) 245-0780.

 

Here’s why many people want their BlackBerrys back after switching to iOS and Android

Following the release of the original iPhone in 2007 and the subsequent launch of Android, many people with work-issued phones spent years asking for their employers to switch away from BlackBerry smartphones to more modern devices. Finally, as Apple and Google increased their focus on security and BlackBerry hit dire straights a few years ago, workers began getting what that wanted and bring your own device (BYOD) policies became more common.

More recently, however, an interesting trend is being observed: Workers want their BlackBerry’s back.

CIO’s Tom Kaneshige reports on an interesting phenomenon that we’ve heard rumblings of in the past. At companies where employees were permitted to ditch their work-issued BlackBerry phones and bring their own iPhones and Android handsets, they’re now begging their IT departments to move back to BlackBerry.

Why? It turns out there are a few reasons.

For one thing, there are privacy concerns. When workers use their own iOS and Android devices, IT departments gain access to all of their private data in addition to any corporate apps that might be on the devices. It’s never a good thing when you have to hand over a smartphone packed full of naked selfies so that IT can fix an issue with email not syncing properly.

Beyond that, IT professionals Kaneshige spoke with say they are having some serious problems with mobile device management (MDM) software, and the related on-device apps often cause issues like battery drain and device bogging.

Source: BGR

Android and Windows smartphones to get ‘kill switch’

Google and Microsoft have both revealed that they will integrate a ‘kill switch’ into the next versions of their smartphone operating systems, allowing customers to disable their devices if they are lost or stolen.

Google told Bloomberg that it will add a “factory reset protection solution” to its next version of Android

Meanwhile, Microsoft’s vice president for US government affairs, Fred Humphries, said that the company would be adding new anti-theft capabilities to its Find My Phone feature in Windows Phone before July 2015.

“With these additional features, we’re hopeful that technology – as part of a broader strategy – can help to further reduce incentives for criminals to steal smartphones in the first place,” Humphries said in a blog post.

The news comes after Apple introduced ‘activation lock’ and ‘delete phone’ to its Find My iPhone app in September 2013.

As a result, robberies involving the company’s products reportedly decreased by 19 per cent in New York in the first five months of this year. San Francisco and London have also seen Apple-related robberies drop.

New York attorney general Eric Schneiderman said the statistics illustrate the “stunning effectiveness of kill switches”, and has called for other smartphone companies to add theft-deterrence features to their devices.

US Senator Amy Klobuchar, a Minnesota Democrat, and Jose Serrano, a New York Democrat, have both introduced bills that would require phones sold in the US to include kill-switch technology.

Last summer, the Mayor of London Boris Johnson also wrote to eight companies – including Apple, Samsung and Google – stating that about 10,000 handsets are stolen every month in London, and manufacturers have a “corporate responsibility” to help tackle thefts.

“If we are to deter theft and help prevent crimes that victimise your customers and the residents and visitors to our city, we need meaningful engagement from business and a clear demonstration that your company is serious about your corporate responsibility to help solve this problem,” Mr Johnson told manufacturers.

“Each of your companies promote the security of your devices, their software and information they hold, but we expect the same effort to go into hardware security so that we can make a stolen handset inoperable and so eliminate the illicit second-hand market in these products.

“We hope you would support this objective. Customers and shareholders surely deserve to know that business cannot and must not benefit directly from smartphone theft through sales of replacement devices.”

Source: The Telegraph

Apple Fixes “Fundamental” SSL Bug in iOS 7

Apple quietly released iOS 7.06 late Friday afternoon, fixing a problem in how iOS 7 validates SSL certificates. Attackers can exploit this issue to launch a man-in-the-middle attack and eavesdrop on all user activity, experts warned.

“An attacker with a privileged network position may capture or modify data in sessions protected by SSL/TLS,” Apple said in its advisory.

Users should update immediately.

Watch Out for Eavesdroppers
As usual, Apple didn’t provide a lot of information about the issue, but security experts familiar with the vulnerability warned that attackers on the same network as the victim would be able to read secure communications. In this case, the attacker could intercept, and even modify, the messages as they pass from the user’s iOS 7 device to secured sites, such as Gmail or Facebook, or even for online banking sessions. The issue is a “fundamental bug in Apple’s SSL implementation,” said Dmitri Alperovich, CTO of CrowdStrike.

The software update is available for the current version of iOS for iPhone 4 and later, 5th generation iPod Touch, and iPad 2 and later. iOS 7.06 and iOS 6.1.6. The same flaw exists in the latest version of Mac OS X but has not yet been patched, Adam Langley, a senior engineer at Google, wrote on his ImperialViolet blog. Langley confirmed the flaw was also in iOS 7.0.4 and OS X 10.9.1

Certificate validation is critical in establishing secure sessions, as this is how a site (or a device) verifies that the information is coming from a trusted source. By validating the certificate, the bank website knows that the request is coming from the user, and is not a spoofed request by an attacker. The user’s browser also relies on the certificate to verify the response came from the bank’s servers and not from an attacker sitting in the middle and intercepting sensitive communications.

Update Devices
It appears Chrome and Firefox, which uses NSS instead of SecureTransport, aren’t affected by the vulnerability even if the underlying OS is vulnerable, Langley said. He created a test site at https://www.imperialviolet.org:1266. “If you can load an HTTPS site on port 1266 then you have this bug,” Langley said

Users should update their Apple devices as soon as possible, and when the OS X update is available, to apply that patch as well. The updates should be applied while on a trusted network, and users should really avoid accessing secure sites while on untrusted networks (especially Wi-Fi) while traveling/

“On unpatched mobile and laptop devices, set ‘Ask to Join Networks’ setting to OFF, which will prevent them from showing prompts to connect to untrusted networks,” wrote Alex Radocea, a researcher from CrowdStrike.

Considering recent concerns about the possibility of government snooping, the fact that iPhones and iPads were not validating certificates correctly can be alarming for some. “I’m not going to talk details about the Apple bug except to say the following. It is seriously exploitable and not yet under control,” Matthew Green, a cryptography professor at Johns Hopkins University, posted on Twitter.

Check out this video from News Loop:

 

Source: PC World Security Watch

BBM Finally Launches on iPhone and Android

404524-bbmIt has taken much longer than many industry watchers predicted, but Blackberry has finally gotten around to releasing a BBM app for iPhone and Android. The company has had a tough time of it lately, but maybe software is the way to keep the lights on. The app is now live in the App Store and Google Play, but there a waiting list.

BBM leaked on Android a few weeks back when the company was preparing for launch. The influx of new users caused server issues for Blackberry and delayed the launch. This is the reason for the waiting list, which most users will be subjected to. Anyone who signed up ahead of time for the service on the BBM website can log right in, but otherwise you’ll have to provide an email address and wait it out.

When you do get access, you’ll make a Blackberry ID and add your personal information. If you’ve used BBM on a Blackberry in the past, your contacts will populate immediately. If not, you’ll have to invite people. This process is different (and a bit counterintuitive) for first time users. BBM makes contact lists more secure, so you have to send the invite based on PIN, NFC pairing, or sending an email. You only get the contact added when the other party accepts the invitation.

BBM was the originator of the modern read receipt, and while that’s been replicated in both iMessage and Hangouts, BBM still does it pretty well. You can also do group chats, share pictures, and send files. It basically does all the stuff the first-part messaging clients do, but it’s running through Blackberry’s servers. If you’re worried about security, this should be on your radar.

The app is available for iPhone and Android phones. There isn’t any tablet support at this time.

Source: PC Magazine

Ryan Says: About FREAKING time!  Buh Bye WhatsApp!

‘Critical’ security warning for BlackBerry Z10

A vulnerability in the BlackBerry Protect software built into Z10 smart phones could allow hackers to gain access to the passwords of some devices, according to a security advisory issued by BlackBerry

By taking advantage of “weak permissions” malicious applications will be able to:

  • Gain the device password if a remote password reset command had been issued through the BlackBerry Web site
  • Intercept and prevent the phone from acting on BlackBerry Protect commands, such as remote wipe
BlackBerry said the issue is with the BlackBerry Protect software and not the Z10’s operating system.

“The most severe potential impact of this vulnerability requires a BlackBerry Z10 smart phone user to install a specially crafted malicious app, enable BlackBerry Protect and reset the device password through BlackBerry Protect,” the advisory said.

With the device password and physical access to the phone, an attacker can:

• Access the functionality of the smartphone (including the BlackBerry Hub, apps, data, and the phone) by unlocking the smartphone.
• Unlock the work perimeter on a BlackBerry Z10 smartphone that has BlackBerry Balance technology enabled if the work perimeter password is the same as the device password.
• Access the smartphone over a USB tether with either BlackBerry Link or the computer’s file viewer, allowing access to the smartphone’s personal files, contacts, PIM data, and so on. The attacker could also access work perimeter content on BlackBerry Balance smartphones if the work perimeter is unlocked and access over a USB tether is allowed by a policy that the IT administrator sets.
• Enable development mode after accessing the smartphone over a USB tether, allowing remote access as a low privilege development user.
• Change the current device password, allowing the attacker to deny access to the legitimate user of the smartphone.
• Access any other local and enterprise services for which the legitimate user has used the same password as the smartphone’s password.

An attacker can also gain Wi-Fi access to the phone if the owner enables Wi-Fi storage access on the Z10 and sets a storage access password that is the same as the device password.

Russian BadNews bug found in Android app store

Security researchers have identified 32 separate apps on Google Play that harboured a bug called BadNews.

On infected phones, BadNews stole cash by racking up charges from sending premium rate text messages.

The malicious program lay dormant on many handsets for weeks to escape detection, said security firm Lookout which uncovered BadNews.

The malware targeted Android owners in Russia, Ukraine, Belarus and other countries in eastern Europe.

The exact numbers of victims was hard to calculate, said Lookout, adding that figures from Google Play suggest that between two and nine million copies of apps booby trapped with BadNews were downloaded from the store.

In a blogpost, Lookout said that a wide variety of apps were harbouring the BadNews malware. It found the programme lurking inside recipe generators, wallpaper apps, games and pornographic programmes.

The 32 apps were available through four separate developer accounts on Play. Google has now suspended those accounts and removed all the affected apps from its online store. No official comment from Google has yet been released.

Lookout said BadNews concealed its true identity by initially acting as an “innocent, if somewhat aggressive, advertising network”. In this guise it sent users news and information about other infected apps, and prompted people to install other programmes.

BadNews adopted this approach to avoid detection systems that look for suspicious behaviour and stop dodgy apps being installed, said Lookout.

This masquerade ended when apps seeded with BadNews got a prompt from one of three command and control servers, then it started pushing out and installing a more malicious programme called AlphaSMS. This steals credit by sending text messages to premium rate numbers.

Users were tricked into installing AlphaSMS as it was labelled as an essential update for either Skype or Russian social network Vkontakte.

Security firm Lookout said BadNews was included in many popular apps by innocent developers as it outwardly looked like a useful way to monetise their creations. It urged app makers to be more wary of such “third party tools” which they may include in their code.

Half of the 32 apps seeded with BadNews are Russian and the version of AlphaSMS it installed is tuned to use premium rate numbers in Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Armenia and Kazakhstan.

Source: BBC News

Lock Screen Security Bug Found: Samsung Galaxy S3

Following closely on the heels of a Samsung Galaxy Note 2 security vulnerability, another Samsung user has found that the bug affects other models.

Unlike the Samsung Galaxy Note 2 flaw, the bug allows for full access to the Samsung Galaxy S3. The method is similar in that it requires a fleet-fingered user to hop through a number of screens.

As discovered by Sean McMillian, the smartphone can be manipulated by tapping through the emergency call, emergency contacts, home screen, and then the power button twice. McMillian admits that the bug isn’t consistent — sometimes, he said, it works right away, while other times it takes 20 attempts.

Indeed, we weren’t able to replicate the bug after many tries (Engadget was able to do it, but it took a long time). That suggests that would-be snoopers must act quickly and deftly, but the lesson here (and always) is to keep a watchful eye on that $500 smartphone.

As McMillian indicates, the bug seems to be related to Samsung’s software and not an Android-wide issue. Judging by the similarities in the two flaws, we might expect Samsung to issue software updates to address the concerns.

Source: CNET

iOS 6.0.1 already jailbroken — for some devices

iOS 6.0.1 users can now jailbreak their devices, but there are some bumps in the road.

The latest version of the iPhone Dev Team’s Redsn0w can jailbreak iOS 6.0.1 devices, Redmond Pie confirmed today after testing the update.

However, not everyone can take advantage of the effort at this point.

The jailbreak works only on iOS devices powered by an A4 chip or lower. People who own the iPhone 5, the newest iPads, or the latest iPod Touch are out of luck. The jailbreak takes advantage of the Limera1n exploit, which can’t handle the A5 or later chips.

That leaves just the iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, and the iPod Touch 4G as prime candidates. The iPod Touch 3G and the original iPad don’t support iOS 6.0 or higher.

The jailbreak is also a tethered one. So after you shut down or reboot your device, you’ll need to connect it to your computer to return it to a jailbroken state.

Apple, or course, isn’t too fond of jailbreaking, a process that allows device owners to unlock certain features and install apps not found in the App Store.

The iPhone maker once tried to argue that the action violates its copyright. The U.S. Copyright Office recently ruled that jailbreaking is illegal on tablets and gaming consoles but not on smartphones.

Source: CNET