Category: iPhone Repair


iPhone 4S iOS 5.1.1 Unlock Now Available at Ryan’s Unlock Shop

The long awaited  iPhone 4S iOS 5.1.1 Unlock is now available for purchase off of our unlocking website.  The newest unlock on the market works flawlessly with easy to use function, no programming, no 112, no SIM cutting required!  This unlock has been fully tested and will work with every carrier in Canada!

We have a limited quantity of the newest iOS 5.1.1 unlock so if you need one, give us a call or checkout on the site (Free Shipping to anywhere in Canada is INCLUDED.)

What are the “Top 4” benefits of Unlocking and Jailbreaking an iPhone 4S?

More and better apps

The main reason for unlocking your iPhone is to be able to install as many apps as you wish. This cannot happen when you have your iPhone running on the software that you bought with it. Some of the most important apps that will serve you are normally restricted. Most of the times when you try to install them on your new iPhone you will receive an error message similar to this- the application is not from a trusted supplier.  The best way that you can avoid this is by unlocking the newly purchased iPhone. After all, you bought the phone so that it could serve you in the ways that you wish for.

Change your iPhone camera to perform video recording

Well, many of us who have been using the iPhone can bear witness that the mobile handset does not perform video recording as expected by most users. This is one disadvantage that the iPhone developers failed to consider. You can easily overcome this nightmare by trying out to unlock your iPhone. Once you have unlocked it you will be able to use the normal camera that the phone has to carry out video recording. This will require you to install other applications that will facilitate this.

Use the best themes

One thing that we are used to in the iPhones is the normal interface that they have on their handsets. Are you bored by this? Well, I am a victim that cannot bear having the same theme each year I get a new iPhone. Therefore the best way to solve this issue is to unlock my iphone. It is very easy to download and install the themes that you want once your iPhone is unlocked. You should try out the themes that are compatible with your iPhone I am sure that you will love it.

Feeling of being free

Last but not least, the most important reason that we decide to have our iPhones unlocked is to have the feeling of being free to do anything. It is very hard to carry out any function on the iPhone that you have before you get to unlock it. This is because everything is copyright protected. This means that you are limited to the usage of your device. This is why we look for options that will break us free from the carrier that we are using.

 

Hands On With Clueful, the iOS App That Rats Out Privacy Risks

When you install a new mobile app, you expect it to use your data according to the permissions you’ve allowed. So, when an app suddenly uses your information in an unexpected way — who can forget Path’s address-book-sharing saga? — it can feel like a betrayal.

Clueful, which made its debut at TechCrunch Disrupt today, is an app designed to prevent surprises. Clueful helps you identify “misdemeanant” apps on your iPhone — software that’s transmitting your data in ways you weren’t aware of.

Created by antivirus software developer Bitdefender, the app is simple enough. It gathers information on what apps are running in your iPhone’s memory and submits it anonymously to the “Clueful Cloud” for analysis. Using its own database of app behaviors, it then tells you what your software could be up to: whether an app uses GPS, whether an app is a battery-draining risk, or if an app can use address book information, among other things. The results are neatly listed, albeit in what appears to be random order, and you can tap an app listing to get more details on the possible risk areas of that app.

It’s not all fire and brimstone, though. The app also reveals “Things you might appreciate” for each app, such as information on whether it uses an anonymous identifier or encrypts stored data. (Foodspotting, for instance, does both of these things.)

It can be surprising to learn which apps do and don’t have solid security practices, and which apps are quietly tracking usage information for advertising purposes — something most apps do not openly reveal when you download them.

The app has several major pitfalls, though. For one, it can only provide information on free apps, so that sketchy $1 Angry Birds ripoff you got last week could be having a field day with your personal info, and you’d still never know it. And although it launches with a database of thousands of apps, there are more than 600,000 apps in the App Store, according to Apple’s Q2 earnings report. Clueful lets you search to see which apps are in its database, and we found some relatively big names were left out: Clear, Mint and Evi to name just three.

Also, Clueful doesn’t drill down into exactly what data is being transmitted from an app. Instead, it just generally reports what an app can and could be sending. (“Can” and “could” are differentiated.) Strangely, Clueful also “found” apps on my phone that I’ve never used or downloaded, like FlickFishing HD in the image above, and apps called Scoops and Quizarium. I’m sure they’re fine apps, but I’ve never downloaded them.

At $4 in the App Store, I can’t rightly recommend this app as a must-download. But if you’re completely anal about how your data is being used, or just curious, the download could be justified.

Source: Wired

Apple patches serious security holes in iOS devices

Apple has shipped a high-priority iOS update to fix multiple security holes affecting the browser used on iPhones, iPads and iPod Touch devices.

The iOS 5.1.1 update fixes four separate vulnerabilities, including one that could be used to take complete control of an affected device.

Here’s the skinny of this batch of updates:

  • A URL spoofing issue existed in Safari. This could be used in a malicious web site to direct the user to a spoofed site that visually appeared to be a legitimate domain. This issue is addressed through improved URL handling. This issue does not affect OS X systems.
  • Multiple security holes in the open-source WebKit rendering engine. These could lead to cross-site scripting attacks from maliciously crafted web sites. These vulnerabilities were used during Google’s Pwnium contest at this year’s CanSecWest conference.
  • A memory corruption issue in WebKit. Visiting a maliciously crafted website may lead to an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution. This issue was discovered and reported by Google’s security team.

This patch is only available via iTunes. To check that the iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad has been updated:

  1. Navigate to Settings
  2. Select General
  3. Select About. The version after applying this update will be “5.1.1″.

Ryan says: As always, do not update to 5.1.1 if your iPhone is unlocked or jailbroken already or if you plan doing this in the future.

Tether: Wireless tethering for only $30 per year

For those of you constantly traveling and unable to access a Wi-Fi connection for your Mac or PC, but unwilling to dish out the $360 a year that some carriers will require for native tethering, you can download Tether’s application for $15 for the first year and $30 for the years following.

While jail breaking is one option for avoiding the cost of tethering, other people may find that paying $30 per-year is worth avoiding the hassle of hacking a phone. Plus, for those of us who have a tendency to drop our phones, voiding the warranty and keep customer support and geniuses at bay is also reason enough to avoid the hack — which is why Tether is such a great service.

Initially launched in November 2011, Tether was originally accepted into Apple’s iTunes App Store. But the app was taken down only a few days later because it violated Apple’s terms. Since then, the team had been creating a workaround. And now, they’ve unveiled the latest version of Tether, built using its patent-pending technology, made possible by HTML5. This time around, the team decided to forgo the app’s submission to Apple altogether, seeing as how acceptance into the iTunes App Store was highly unlikely. Instead, Tether is entirely We-based, letting it bypass Apple’s scrutiny.

The service is available for Blackberry, iPhone and Android, and will currently work for any carrier throughout the world. But it’s a game of cat and mouse. Once the major carriers discern how to distinguish a tethered phone using HTML5 from a non-tethered phone, Tether users will run the risk of being forcibly upgraded to the carrier’s tethering plan, or risk being charged extra for the data sent while being tethered to your computer as per the carrier’s terms of service.

Using Tether isn’t too difficult as the video below will show you. You’ll need to download and install the appropriate software for your operating system, and proceed to create an ad-hoc network on your computer by entering in a password (if desired) for the auto-generated SSID. Note that if once Tether is open on your desktop, your current Wi-Fi connection will be disabled to make way for the tethered connection.

On your phone, find and select the ad-hoc network from list of available Wi-Fi. Then, using your mobile browser, you will be required to log into your paid account on tether.com/web. After logging in, you’re tethered and able to browse the Web on your computer right away.

 

Source: DigitalTrends