Category: Computers


Ryans_PC_Repair_Shop-motherboard_pointIt’s that time of year again, the kids are going back to school and they need their computers and phones fixed before school starts!  Every year we get a huge rush in September so this year we’ve decided to offer every student that shows their student ID’s with the purchase and you will get an additional 10% off your computer or cell phone repair!

For our unlocking site UnlockMyPhone.ca use promo code “BACKTOSCHOOL2016” for an additional $5 dollars off any unlocking code or iPhone Factory Unlocking service.

We also wanted to give our current and new customers a huge heads up that we have the BIGGEST selection of gadgets, computer and phone accessories in the fraser valley in our shop on display at wholesale prices that can’t be beat!

Mention this post with your Glass/LCD Repair for a FREE GIFT!

VALID UNTIL SEPTEMBER 30th, 2016!

Just a quick update for our clients in the Fraser Valley and surrounding areas.  We are open for business between 9AM and 6PM.  If you need a device repaired feel free to pop by between business hours, no need for an appointment but a phone call ahead is always a good idea.

Over the last month we have increased our inventory for cell phone and computer accessories dramatically.  We have the biggest selection of phone cases and cell phone adapters in town for sure!  New stock arriving everyday and we do accept special orders for items you want but can’t find anywhere else.

Don’t forget guys, we will beat any cell phone repair price, be sure to mention you were quoted a price by a competitor and we will beat the price! (Hope – Langley Area Competitors only)

If you are looking for a great deal on a PC Tune-Up for $89.99 we are now offering multi operating system options including:

  • Windows 7 Ultimate
  • Windows 8.1
  • Windows 10 Pro
  • Linux Mint
  • Ubuntu
  • Mac OS X

Our tune-up special includes a full line of software including a fully customized TV & Movies app installed. You will be blown away by the work we do compared to our competitors, trust me! – Ryan

 

iPad is an iFAD: Now we know why Apple went running to IBM

Apple fell over itself to talk up strong Mac and iOS device sales in its latest quarter – but the real news is a slump in iPad numbers.

The Cupertino giant said the three-month period ending June 28 was its best ever fiscal third quarter on record. Its $37.4bn revenues, up six per cent year on year, led to a $7.7bn net income up from $6.9bn a year ago [PDF]. Apple’s $1.28 profit per diluted share, up from $1.07 in Q3 fiscal 2013, was slightly above Yahoo! Finance and Marketwatch average estimate of $1.23.

Boss Tim Cook said that the best-ever Q3 report was driven in part by Mac and iPhone sales, which were also records for that quarterly period. Apple said that it sold 35.2m iPhones (up 13 per cent), bagging $19.75bn in revenue (up nine per cent), and 4.4m Macs (up 18 per cent), bringing home $5.5bn (up 13 per cent).

Though iPhone and Mac sales were strong, the iPad had a rough quarter as tablet revenues at Apple were down 8 per cent, year on year, to $5.8bn from 13.2m units sold (down 9 per cent). Cook credited the drop in part to inventory reduction over the quarter.

The Apple CEO also expressed hope that the iPad business will be bolstered by the recently announced mobile mega-deal with IBM. He noted that the partnership with Big Blue will allow for tablet-specific apps to be written rather than just adapted from desktop software.

“We think there is a substantial upside in business,” Cook said.

“We think that the core thing that unleashes this is a better go-to-market, but even more importantly, apps that are written with mobile first in mind.”

Apple’s CEO is also hoping to get a boost from the company’s developer and content partners on its iTunes and App Store services. The company reported $4.4bn in quarterly revenues from the iTunes, Software and Services unit, up 12 per cent on Q3 fiscal 2013.

Cook said that over its life to date, the App Store has served up 75 billion downloads and paid out $20bn in revenues to app developers.

As for revenues broken down by region, China romped home with 28 per cent growth on Q3 fiscal 2013; the Americas and Japan has flat revenue growth, year on year, of one per cent; and Europe and the rest of the Asia Pacific grew six per cent. Retail store sales were also flat at one per cent, year on year.

The Apple head honcho also talked up the coming tie-up with Beats Electronics, which is set to become the 30th Apple acquisition of the year when it is expected to close in the coming quarter.

With the back-to-school shopping season kicking off and the release of OS X Yosemite and iOS 8 looming, Apple is predicting an even stronger quarter, ending late September. The biz is estimating that its Q4 numbers will see revenues between $37bn and $40bn, putting the company on track to surpass $175bn in revenues for the full fiscal year.

Source: The Register

The Heartbleed bug: Am I at risk and do I really have to change my password?

The discovery of Heartbleed, a flaw in one of the most widespread encryption standards used online, has panicked webmasters and users alike.

The bug has gone unnoticed for more than two years and could have potentially given hackers access to an unlimited array of secure data — everything from passwords and login details to credit card numbers and addresses.

Although it’s difficult to say exactly how many websites have been exposed, the lower estimates are around 500 million with a large number of major web companies (Google, Facebook, Yahoo, etc) all forced to update their software to protect against the bug.

However, there have been quite a lot of mixed messages as to whether or not users should change their passwords, with some outlets urging that you should create new ones immediately while others are advising that you wait.

To add to the confusion there’s also been reports of hackers sending out phishing emails related to Heartbleed — in order to trick users into giving up passwords that have yet to be compromised. Be on the look out for these and don’t follow any links in suspicious looking emails – if you want to change a password go to the site directly.

Which sites are affected?
Most Google sites and services (including Gmail and YouTube – but not Chrome) were affected, as were sites maintained by Yahoo (including Tumblr and Flickr). Facebook was also hit by the bug although Twitter and LinkedIn were not.

Other big sites that have confirmed that they weren’t affected include Amazon, Hotmail and Outlook, eBay, PayPal and all of Apple’s properties — including iCloud and iTunes. If you want to check whether or not a site you use is still affected then you can do so here — just enter the URL.

Another big worry is for online banking, but thankfully we have some good news in that department. Lloyds, HSBC, RBS, Natwest, Santander and the Co-Op have all confirmed that they were not affected by the bug (they were using different encryption standards). Barclays has yet to issue a statement.

However, this does not mean that your credit card details are completely safe — as they could have been compromised via your Gmail or another third-party site. The security of mobile banking apps is still a developing situation as well.

So do I need to change my passwords?
In a word: Yes. For the sites we’ve listed above as being affected (including Gmail, Yahoo, Tumblr, Flickr, Facebook) it definitely won’t hurt to change your password some time in the next couple of weeks.

Although security experts have warned that you shouldn’t be too quick to change passwords, this is because not all website have patched their servers and changing your password before this happens could make matters worse. The sites we’ve listed above have patched their servers and if you want to check one we’ve not mentioned — click here and enter the URL.

Unfortunately, some sites (including Google) have specifically said that users don’t need to change their passwords. While it’s true that some sites are confident that they fixed the bug a while back, as most of us are guilty of changing our passwords less frequently than we should do (aka never) we think that this is as good an opportunity as ever to be a bit more security-conscious.

What should my new password be?
In lists of the most frequently used passwords online there’s some obvious clangers that we know you’re too smart to use (these include old standbys such as ‘123456’ and ‘password’ itself) but just because a password doesn’t look obvious to you that doesn’t make it safe.

This means that you shouldn’t really use any single words that are found in the dictionary, any words connected to you (place of birth or pets’ names), nor should you use any obvious ‘substitutions’ (eg pa55w0rd — more complicated variations are required) or patterns derived from your keyboard layout (eg ‘1qaz2wsx’ or ‘zxcvbnm’).

It’s wise to use a variety of characters in your password (including upper and lower case as well as numbers) but an easy way to get more secure is to start thinking of your password as a passphrase.

The easiest way of increasing the difficulty of a password is by simply making it longer — so try combining multiple words together and then adding in numbers between them.

You could pick a number of some significance to you (for example a loved one’s birthday, ie 12/08/1970) and then splicing this with a nonsensical phrase (‘shoesplittingwatchwizard’) to get a suitably difficulty password: Shoe12Splitting08Watch1970Wizard.

Other suggested methods for making a strong and memorable password include taking a sentence or a favourite line from a song as a starting point. So you might take the line “When you call my name it’s like a little prayer” and turn it into wuCmNilaLP. Madonna is optional of course, but we think this a fun method — especially if you can work in numbers somewhere.

You should also use different passwords for your different accounts (perhaps the most difficult piece of advice to follow of all) and if you want to be really secure you should also set up two-step authentication where available.

Ryan says: I recommend everyone on any of the sites mentioned in this article to change their passwords ASAP.

Bitcoins, other digital currencies stolen in massive ‘Pony’ botnet attack

Cybercriminals have infected the computers of digital currency holders, using a virus known as “Pony” to make off with account credentials, bitcoins and other digital currencies in one of the largest attacks on the technology, security services firm Trustwave said.

The attack was carried out using the “Pony” botnet, a group of infected computers that take orders from a central command-and-control server to steal private data. A small group of cybercriminals were likely behind the attack, Trustwave said.

Over 700,000 credentials, including website, email and FTP account log-ins, were stolen in the breach. The computers belonging to between 100,000 and 200,000 people were infected with the malware, Trustwave said.

The Pony botnet has been identified as the source of some other recent attacks, including the theft of some 2 million log-ins for sites like Facebook, Google and Twitter. But the latest exploit is unique due to its size and because it also targeted virtual wallets storing bitcoins and other digital currencies like Litecoins and Primecoins.

Eighty-five wallets storing the equivalent of $220,000, as of Monday, were broken into, Trustwave said. That figure is low because of the small number of people using Bitcoin now, the company said, though instances of Pony attacks against Bitcoin are likely to increase as adoption of the technology grows. The attackers behind the Pony botnet were active between last September and mid-January.

“As more people use digital currencies over time, and use digital wallets to store them, it’s likely we’ll see more attacks to capture the wallets,” said Ziv Mador, director of security research at Chicago-based Trustwave.

Most of the wallets that were broken into were unencrypted, he said.

“The motivation for stealing wallets is obviously high—they contain money,” Trustwave said in a blog post describing the attack. Stealing bitcoins might be appealing to criminals because exchanging them for another currency is easier than stealing money from a bank, Trustwave said.

There have been numerous cyberattacks directed at Bitcoin over the last year or so as its popularity grew. Last year, a piece of malware circulating over Skype was identified as running a Bitcoin mining application. Bitcoin mining is a process by which computers monitor the Bitcoin network to validate transactions.

“Like with many new technologies, malware can be an issue,” said a spokesman for the Bitcoin Foundation, a trade group that promotes the use of Bitcoin, via email. Wallet security should improve, the spokesman said, as more security features are introduced, like multisignature transactions, he said.

Digital currency users can go to this Trustwave site to see if their wallets and credentials have been stolen.

Source: PC World

Apple Fixes “Fundamental” SSL Bug in iOS 7

Apple quietly released iOS 7.06 late Friday afternoon, fixing a problem in how iOS 7 validates SSL certificates. Attackers can exploit this issue to launch a man-in-the-middle attack and eavesdrop on all user activity, experts warned.

“An attacker with a privileged network position may capture or modify data in sessions protected by SSL/TLS,” Apple said in its advisory.

Users should update immediately.

Watch Out for Eavesdroppers
As usual, Apple didn’t provide a lot of information about the issue, but security experts familiar with the vulnerability warned that attackers on the same network as the victim would be able to read secure communications. In this case, the attacker could intercept, and even modify, the messages as they pass from the user’s iOS 7 device to secured sites, such as Gmail or Facebook, or even for online banking sessions. The issue is a “fundamental bug in Apple’s SSL implementation,” said Dmitri Alperovich, CTO of CrowdStrike.

The software update is available for the current version of iOS for iPhone 4 and later, 5th generation iPod Touch, and iPad 2 and later. iOS 7.06 and iOS 6.1.6. The same flaw exists in the latest version of Mac OS X but has not yet been patched, Adam Langley, a senior engineer at Google, wrote on his ImperialViolet blog. Langley confirmed the flaw was also in iOS 7.0.4 and OS X 10.9.1

Certificate validation is critical in establishing secure sessions, as this is how a site (or a device) verifies that the information is coming from a trusted source. By validating the certificate, the bank website knows that the request is coming from the user, and is not a spoofed request by an attacker. The user’s browser also relies on the certificate to verify the response came from the bank’s servers and not from an attacker sitting in the middle and intercepting sensitive communications.

Update Devices
It appears Chrome and Firefox, which uses NSS instead of SecureTransport, aren’t affected by the vulnerability even if the underlying OS is vulnerable, Langley said. He created a test site at https://www.imperialviolet.org:1266. “If you can load an HTTPS site on port 1266 then you have this bug,” Langley said

Users should update their Apple devices as soon as possible, and when the OS X update is available, to apply that patch as well. The updates should be applied while on a trusted network, and users should really avoid accessing secure sites while on untrusted networks (especially Wi-Fi) while traveling/

“On unpatched mobile and laptop devices, set ‘Ask to Join Networks’ setting to OFF, which will prevent them from showing prompts to connect to untrusted networks,” wrote Alex Radocea, a researcher from CrowdStrike.

Considering recent concerns about the possibility of government snooping, the fact that iPhones and iPads were not validating certificates correctly can be alarming for some. “I’m not going to talk details about the Apple bug except to say the following. It is seriously exploitable and not yet under control,” Matthew Green, a cryptography professor at Johns Hopkins University, posted on Twitter.

Check out this video from News Loop:

 

Source: PC World Security Watch

Here Is How Hackers Can Spy On Your MacBook Camera

Just a few months ago, a story broke about how Samsung smart TVs were susceptible to remote spying by users that hack into the built-in camera. Now, new research demonstrates that MacBook webcams are just as susceptible to being hacked and spied-on as televisions.

Researchers at John Hopkins University discovered exactly how the hacking process is possible without signaling for the light adjacent to the camera to turn on, which is usually an indication that the camera is on.

The primary researcher, computer science professor Stephen Checkoway, published a paper in conjunction with graduate student Matthew Brocker entitled “iSeeYou: Disabling the MacBook Webcam Indicator LED” that contains the detailed process of remotely spying on others’ laptops. Although the researchers could only prove their methods worked with MacBooks created before 2008, they suggest that the process could be successfully repeated with newer computers.

The Washington Post recently ran an article detailing the story of Miss Teen USA Cassidy Wolf, who received nude photographs of herself via email. After an FBI investigation, the authorities discovered that Wolf’s former high school classmate Jared Abrahams had hacked into her computer, as well as the computers of several other women, and had been spying on them via their webcam.

The case of Wolf as well as the new research from John Hopkins raises several issues about privacy and security in the modern world. While Apple’s light was intended as a security feature to alert users when their camera was on, it appears that hackers have found an easily solution to disable that feature. According to The Washington Post, the FBI has been using similar hacking technology for years.

Source: PRPick.com

Researchers describe hacking iOS devices with malicious charger

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology will be demonstrating a proof-of-concept method of hacking an iPhone using a malicious USB charger. Billy Lau, Yeongjin Jang, Chengyu Song announced the demonstration for Black Hat USA 2013, an annual conference for hackers and security researchers that begins on July 27th in Las Vegas.

The short version is the three researchers found a way to use USB protocols to bypass some of Apple’s security features in iOS that prevent unauthorized software from being installed on your iOS device. The three built a charger based on a BeagleBoard (see below)—a US$125 computer-on-a-circuit-board—that was able to successfully insert malware onto an iPhone plugged into it.

Worse, they can do so in under a minute.

“Despite the plethora of defense mechanisms in iOS, we successfully injected arbitrary software into current-generation Apple devices running the latest operating system (OS) software,” the researchers wrote on their BlackHat presentation description. “All users are affected, as our approach requires neither a jailbroken device nor user interaction.”

In the demonstration, they said will discuss Apple’s existing security mechanisms that protect against “arbitrary software installation,” which in layman’s terms essentially means malware. They will then describe how standard USB capabilities can be, “leveraged to bypass these defense mechanisms.” To finish it off, they will demonstrate how this same process can be used to then hide the resulting malware from the user the same way Apple hides its own built in software.

The three researchers named their malicious charger “Mactans.”

The BeagleBoard it is based on is an off-the-shelf circuit board that can be used to create all manner of tiny computing devices running Angstrom (Open Embedded), Debian, Ubuntu, and Gentoo. There are other BeagleBoard products as well, including a slightly larger model with a 1GHz Sitara ARM Cortex-A8 processors that can run Android.

The point the researchers are making is that their method can be accomplished with readily available technology.

“While Mactans was built with limited amount of time and a small budget,” they wrote, “we also briefly consider what more motivated, well-funded adversaries could accomplish.”

The researchers will offer methods for protecting yourself against such an attack—we’ll throw out that you should probably be choosy about using a charger whose provenance you can’t verify—and what Apple can do to make this attack, “substantially more difficult to pull off.”

Source: UPI

BitTorrent’s Secure Dropbox Alternative Goes Public

BitTorrent Inc. has opened up its Sync app to the public today. The new application is free of charge and allows people to securely sync folders to multiple devices using the BitTorrent protocol. Complete control over the storage location of the files and the absence of limits is what sets BitTorrent’s solution apart from traditional cloud based synchronization services.

Dropbox, Google Drive, Microsoft Skydrive and Mega are just a few examples of the many file-storage and backup services that are available today.

All these services rely on external cloud based hosting to back up and store files. This means that you have to trust these companies with your personal and confidential files, and that your storage space is limited.

For those people who want to be in control of their own data there haven’t been many alternatives, but BitTorrent Sync has the potential to trigger a small revolution on this front.

BitTorrent Sync’s functionality is comparable to services such as Dropbox and Skydrive, except for the fact that there’s no cloud involved. Users sync the files between their own computers and no third-party has access to it.

Besides increased security, BitTorrent sync transfers also tend to go a lot faster than competing cloud services. Another advantage is that there are no storage or transfer limits, so users can sync as many files as they want, for free.

Earlier this year BitTorrent started a closed Alpha test with a limited number of users, and today Sync is being released to the public for the first time.

“We’re really excited about opening up this Alpha. The feedback has been universally positive. Those in the closed Alpha have already synced more than 200TB since we started the program,” BitTorrent announces.

Over the past weeks many improvements have been made to the Sync application, prompted by user feedback. Among other things it is now possible to allow one-way synchronization and to exclude files or directories from being shared.

While Sync uses BitTorrent technology, people’s files are not accessible to outsiders. Only those who have the unique private key can access the shared folder.

“All the traffic is encrypted using a private key derived from the shared secret. Your files can be viewed and received only by the people with whom you share your private secret,” BitTorrent explains.

To increase security, the latest Sync version also has the option to let the secret key expire after a day so new devices can’t be added, even if outsiders have the private key.

BitTorrent stresses that Sync is still in Alpha development but tests carried out by TorrentFreak confirm that it works very well. It is an ideal tool for people who want to share large amounts of data between computers without going through third-party services.

The application is also surprisingly easy to configure. There’s no need to create an account and it only takes a few clicks to get going.

The Sync application is available for Windows, OSX, Linux and has the ability run on NAS devices through a web-interface. Readers who are interested in giving it a spin can head over to BitTorrent labs, where the Sync app can be downloaded.

Download BitTorrent Sync for Windows here.
Download BitTorrent Sync for Mac 10.6 or newer here.

Source: TorrentFreak

Most of you know about our PC repair services, but did you know we fix/repair/unlock cellphones & tablets? Did you also know that we offer the lowest prices in the Fraser Valley and will price match and BEAT any competitor price? Now you do.

We repair all Smartphones / iPhones for :

* Broken LCD Screens & Touch Screen Replacement
* Water and other Liquid Damage Repair / Corrosion Clean Up
* Phone Data Recovery – Photos, Music, Text Messages
* No Power / Phone does not turn on
* Charging Problems / Charging Controller / Charging Port Replacement
* Battery Replacement (200+ Batteries in stock)
* Staticky, Crackling Speakers & Microphones
* Home Button / Power Lock Button Replacement
* Malfunctioning button, Trackball, Trackpad and Keypad
* Malfunctioning SIM card readers / NO SIM Reading Fix
* Software problems, upgrades and reflashing (All Models)
* Language change
* JTAG Service (Android Phones)
* Unknown Baseband, IMEI missing
* Password Protected / Disabled Phones / Pattern Lock Reset (Samsung)
* Jailbreaking — iPhone, AppleTV 1 & 2 + FREE TV & MOVIES + FREE APPS
* Rooting — Most Android Models — Custom Rom Reflashing Available

We unlock ALL Smartphones For :

* iPhone 2G/3G/3GS (Most iOS Versions)
* iPhone 4/4S – Factory unlock Fido/Rogers/Telus/Koodo/AT&T/Bell
* iPhone 5 – Factory unlock Telus/Koodo/AT&T/Rogers/Fido
* iPhone 4S/5 unlocking for iOS 5.x, 6.1.3 and below!
* BlackBerry, Samsung, LG, HTC
* Nokia, Motorola, Sony Ericsson, Huawei, Alcatel and other Overseas Models.

– iPhone Factory unlock for USA, UK, Brazil, Australia, France, Spain, Ireland, Netherlands, Denmark, Norway, Chile, Switzerland, Sweden, Saudi Arabia, Norway, Romania, Japan, etc.

As always, we DO NOT charge for repairs that cannot be performed.

180 Warranty on ALL parts & Labour – We ONLY use OEM Factory Parts.

Call the shop if you need a price quote, make sure to ask for Ryan.

Sophisticated botnet steals more than $47M by infecting PCs and phones

A new version of the Zeus trojan—a longtime favorite of criminals conducting online financial fraud—has been used in attacks on over 30,000 electronic banking customers in Europe, infecting both their personal computers and smartphones. The sophisticated attack is designed to circumvent banks’ use of two-factor authentication for transactions by intercepting messages sent by the bank to victims’ mobile phones.

The malware and botnet system, dubbed “Eurograbber” by security researchers from Check Point Software and Versafe, was first detected in Italy earlier this year. It has since spread throughout Europe. Eurograbber is responsible for more than $47 million in fraudulent transfers from victims’ bank accounts, stealing amounts from individual victims that range from 500 Euros (about $650) to 25,000 Euros (about $32,000), according to a report published Wednesday.

The malware attack begins when a victim clicks on a malicious link, possibly sent as part of a phishing attack. Clicking on the link directs them to a site that attempts to download one or more trojans: customized versions of Zeus and its SpyEye and CarBerp variants that allow attackers to record Web visits and then inject HTML and JavaScript into the victim’s browser. The next time the victim visits their bank website, the trojans capture their credentials and launch a JavaScript that spoofs a request for a “security upgrade” from the site, offering to protect their mobile device from attack. The JavaScript captures their phone number and their mobile operating system information—which are used in the second level of Eurograbber’s attack.

With the phone number and platform information, the attacker sends a text message to the victim’s phone with a link to a site that downloads what it says is “encryption software” for the device. But it is, in fact, “Zeus in the mobile” (ZITMO) malware—a Trojan crafted for the Android and BlackBerry mobile operating systems that injects itself between the user and the mobile browser and SMS messaging software. With both devices now compromised, the malware waits for the victim to access a bank account, and then immediately transfers a percentage of the victim’s balance to an account set up by the criminals running the botnet.

The malware then intercepts the confirmation text message sent by the bank, forwarding it to the trojan’s command and control server via a relay phone number. The server uses the message to confirm the transaction and withdraw the money. The same process happens every time the victim logs into their bank account, gradually withdrawing money without alerting the user.

Both Checkpoint and Versafe have added signature and behavior detection to their malware protection products that can block Eurograbber. Updating software that is a frequent target for Web “driveby download” exploits—such as Adobe Flash, Java, and Web browsers—can help prevent infection by the malware, as can a healthy amount of paranoia about clicking links in e-mails.

Source: Arstechnica