Archive for November, 2013


Missing Xbox One Dolby audio options coming post-launch

The Xbox One will add support for Dolby 5.1 and 7.1 digital audio through a post-launch patch, director of product planning Albert Penello said today.

“Dolby Digital is coming post launch,” Penello said on NeoGAF. “This was a [software] scheduling issue pure and simple, and I know people are disappointed, but we will have it.”

No timetable for the patch’s release was provided. This means that until the Xbox One audio patch is released, Microsoft’s next-generation system is not capable of doing optical audio on the level of the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, or PlayStation 4.

Penello explained that anyone with an HDMI receiver “should be fine” because uncompressed 5.1 and 7.1 audio is passed through HDMI and DTS.

“Even if you have a Dolby only HDMI receiver (which I’m not sure exists), you will still get 5.1 or 7.1 sound since those receivers should accept uncompressed surround,” he said.

For Dolby-only headsets, Penello said he understands that these should work on Xbox One from launch, though users will only receive stereo audio.

“I have not tested this myself, but I’m told it works. Regardless, I understand this is an inconvenience, but again we’re going to have Dolby coming,” he said.

Headset company Astro, which said previously that its products would work without issue on Xbox One, released a statement on the matter following Microsoft’s announcement, confirming that because the Xbox One will not have Dolby support at launch, there will be ramifications for Astro products.

“While our products do not process DTS signals, we do have on-board Dolby encoding in both our A50 Wireless Transmitter as well as our Wired MixAmp Pro. An Xbox One gamer will need to select Stereo output for game audio, but our MixAmps will process that stereo signal with Dolby ProLogic II and encode it with Dolby Headphone,” the company said.

 

Source: GameSpot

PS4 blinking blue light fault is due to ‘TV compatibility’

PlayStation_FourSony has identified four likely reasons for the most commonly reported PlayStation 4 error, including issues with the hard drive and power supply.

Although Sony claim the failure rate for the PlayStation 4 is only 0.4 per cent if they’ve already sold over 1 million consoles in North America then that still means 4,000 faulty machines are out there in the wild.

Although reports last week, primarily from American press, suggested a problem with the HDMI output that doesn’t seem to be a factor in Sony’s latest update on the problems.

According to official PlayStation Support staff, writing on the PlayStation forums, ‘Some reports have been coming in from users with PS4 units blinking blue, but not entering the powered on state indicated by a white light’.

As well as the blue indicator light blinking, new PlayStation 4 owners have been reporting no video or audio output on their television and the console turning itself off once the light starting flashing.

This could apparently mean any of a number of things, including TV compatibility problems, issues with the PlayStation 4 power supply, issues with PlayStation 4 hard drive, and what support vaguely refer to as ‘issues with other PS4 hardware’.

They suggest that the TV compatibility issue can be resolved by updating the firmware on your TV (implying the problem is primarily with smart TVs).

The other issues are more complicated and it’s implied they may involve returning the console to Sony for repair or replacement.

There are more details at the link, but bear in mind that the contact details are for North America not Europe. So if you do have problems with your launch machine it’s best to visit the official UK support website here.